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I'm trying to put a try-catch into a procedure type method but I'm 95% sure it has to be a function type. What I'm trying to accomplish is to make my code shorter in the main. One of the biggest things I thought of was to put a try-catch into a method and call the method.

The thing is, it will validate the input if it is a integer or not- it even catches the exceptions the problem is that it doesn't "remember" the validated input once it continues on with the program/calculates. Here's the part of the code I'm having trouble with.

 public static void tryCatchNum(double value)
 {
    while(true)
    {
    try
    {
        Scanner iConsole = new Scanner(System.in);
        value = Double.parseDouble(iConsole.nextLine());
            System.out.println(" ");
        break;
    }
    catch(NumberFormatException e)
    {
        System.out.println("NumberFormatException error has oocured. Please try again.");
    }
}

}

And here is the entire program:

    import java.util.Scanner;

    public class ch7exercise1
{
public static double compound(double oA, double cI)
{
    return roundCent((oA*(Math.pow((1+(percent(cI))),10))));
}

public static double percent(double interest)
{
    return interest/100.0;
}

public static double roundCent(double amount)
{
    return ((Math.round(amount*100))/100.0); //100.0 is mandatory.
}

public static void tryCatchNum(double value)
{
    while(true)
    {
        try
        {
            Scanner iConsole = new Scanner(System.in);
            value = Double.parseDouble(iConsole.nextLine());
            System.out.println(" ");
            break;
        }
        catch(NumberFormatException e)
        {
            System.out.println("NumberFormatException error has oocured. Please try again.");
        }
    }
}

@SuppressWarnings("unused")
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    boolean f = true;
    boolean f2 = true;
    double origAmount = 0;
    double compInterest = 0;
    double total = 0;

    Scanner iConsole = new Scanner(System.in);

    System.out.println("10 year Compound Interest Claculator\n");

    System.out.println("Input amount of money deposited in the bank");

    tryCatchNum(origAmount);

    System.out.println("Input compouded interest rate. (If the compound interest is 3% input 3)");

    tryCatchNum(compInterest);

    total = compound(origAmount,compInterest);

    System.out.println("$"+total);


}

}

share|improve this question
    
Double is a primitive so it is passed by value and not passed by reference. – Kevin Bowersox Oct 28 '12 at 22:51
    
double is a primitive; Double is an Object... – DNA Oct 28 '12 at 22:53
    
And object references are also passed by value. Using a Double with the same algorithm wouldn't change anything. – JB Nizet Oct 28 '12 at 22:54
    
Double is immutable. – ignis Oct 28 '12 at 22:55
    
@DNA Sorry that was a capitalization error, just used to starting my sentences with a capital letter. – Kevin Bowersox Oct 28 '12 at 23:00
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Java arguments are passed by value. You're passing 0 to the tryCatchNum method. A copy of the value is passed to the method. This method assigns a new value to its own copy, and then returns. So the original value is still 0.

You must not pass anything to the method. Instead, the method must return the value it has validated. Also, consider using a more appropriate method name:

public double readDoubleValue() {
    ...
    return value;
}

And in the main method:

double origAmount = readDoubleValue(); 
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that will work, maybe a variation but in my program public double tryCatchNum(double value){ .... return value; } is what I have so for the main method double origAmount = tryCatchNum(origAmount) won't work. Also what is it about double and Double that the others are talking about? – SelfDeceit Oct 29 '12 at 2:12
    
Sorry for double posting, but I changed the header to public double instead of public void then I removed the break; and used return value; and the exact same thing happens- it evaluates to "$0.0" no matter what the input is. – SelfDeceit Oct 29 '12 at 2:33
    
Okay I found the resolution. It was quite simple but it subtly revolved around your conclusion. All I had to do was in the main was write: origAmount = tryCatchNum(origAmount); It was just a careless mistake. – SelfDeceit Oct 29 '12 at 3:22

Since double is a primitive in Java it is passed by value to the method, therefore when you alter the value of the primitive the changes to the method parameter are not reflected in the original variable passed into the method call.

Read the cup story on Java ranch which explains pass by value and pass by reference. http://www.javaranch.com/campfire/StoryCups.jsp

The next story to read is the Pass By Value story on Java Ranch. http://www.javaranch.com/campfire/StoryPassBy.jsp

You should alter your method so that it returns a double which is assigned to value in the main method of your program.

I am also very curious as to why you are using a while loop that checks true. I think it is highly likely your program will encounter an infinite loop if the value entered cannot be converted to a double.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I think that would be the point of the try catch, I want it to loop until it knows the input is valid. Then I break; out of the loop, I chose this way because setting a flag for the while loop is, in my opinion, too complicated when I am going to use this as a short-cut to the try and catch methods. – SelfDeceit Oct 29 '12 at 2:22

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