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I'm very new to perl so I searched for some time but still get the answer. I want to get first 100 pairs from a hash table but don't know how to do that. To get each pair from a hash table, we can do something like:

foreach my $term (keys %hashtable)
{
    do something regarding $hashtable{$term} here
}

But how to get first 100 pairs out of it? Thanks a lot!

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I recommend removing the word "first" from this question. Hash tables are not ordered so there is no concept of "first". –  nslntmnx Nov 12 '12 at 11:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm new to Perl too and may be there is more elegant solution, but you can do the following:

my $i = 0;
foreach my $term (keys %hashtable) {
    ...
    do something regarding $hashtable{$term} here
    ...

    last if ($i++) == 100;    
}
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Yes, I tried it and it works. Thanks! –  Iam619 Oct 28 '12 at 23:02
2  
Note that this gets the "first" 101 pairs, not 100. –  choroba Oct 28 '12 at 23:05
1  
ok, I corrected it a bit ... probably this will work fine. If you need a sorted order you can sort the keys by using sort { $a cmp $b} keys %hashtable –  Reflective Oct 28 '12 at 23:08

Note that there is nothing like the first 100 pairs from a hash since a hash has no particular order.

Another solution that should protect your from off-by-one errors:

for my $i (1 .. 100) {
    my ($key, $value) = each %hashtable;
    print "$key => $value\n";
}
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Thanks for reminding that. I want to get the first 100 pairs out of it because I firstly sort the hash table by value. –  Iam619 Oct 28 '12 at 23:09
2  
@lam619 You cannot sort hash by value (or anything else). Hash is unordered, period. What you can do is sort out the keys, then iterate over this sorted array. –  raina77ow Oct 28 '12 at 23:10
1  
@Iam619 With all due respect, it looks like we have a classic XY problem here. You've got a hash of scores (probably in 'player' => 'score') format, and now you need to print the top 100 players along with their scores, is that so? –  raina77ow Oct 28 '12 at 23:15
2  
@Iam619 There's nothing wrong with this particular code: if you already have this hash of players' scores, the for ((sort {...} keys)[0..99] ) part is pretty straightforward. The 'X' here is about the source of this hash: I just can't help wondering why it returns such information in form of a hash (unordered structure), and not an array (ordered structure). –  raina77ow Oct 28 '12 at 23:21
1  
@Iam619 The problem here is, that hashes lose any order because they aren't ordered by definition. I recently answered a question about a hash structure with an additional hash level to "remember" the input order here. –  memowe Oct 29 '12 at 9:39

Another way:

my %hash100 = (%hashtable)[0..199];
while ( my ($key, $value) = each %hash100 ) {
    ...
}

or:

for my $key ( (keys %hashtable)[0..99] ) {
    my $value = $hashtable{$key};
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
An elegant solution. –  varnie Oct 29 '12 at 8:28

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