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Say I have a file dog.txt

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

I can read from the file like this

# include <stdio.h>
int main(){
  char str[10];
  FILE *fp;
  fp = fopen("dog.txt", "r");
  fscanf(fp, "%[ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ]", str);
  printf("%s\n", str);
  return 0;
}

and the program will output T. However instead of listing all the letters, can I utilize the POSIX Character Classes, something like [:upper:] ?

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Why not just try it? –  user529758 Oct 28 '12 at 23:27
1  
No, you can't. Even trying to simulate it with [A-Z] leads to implementation defined behavior (sane standard libraries do what you'd expect, but one that interpreted A-Z as meaning to accept only 'A', '-' and 'Z' would be allowed). –  Jerry Coffin Oct 28 '12 at 23:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, there's no portable way to do it. Some implementations allow you to use character ranges like %[A-Z], but that's not guaranteed by the C standard. C99 §7.19.6.2/12 says this about the [ conversion specifier (emphasis added):

The conversion specifier includes all subsequent characters in the format string, up to and including the matching right bracket (]). The characters between the brackets (the scanlist) compose the scanset, unless the character after the left bracket is a circumflex (^), in which case the scanset contains all characters that do not appear in the scanlist between the circumflex and the right bracket. If the conversion specifier begins with [] or [^], the right bracket character is in the scanlist and the next following right bracket character is the matching right bracket that ends the specification; otherwise the first following right bracket character is the one that ends the specification. If a - character is in the scanlist and is not the first, nor the second where the first character is a ^, nor the last character, the behavior is implementation-defined.

The POSIX.1-2008 description has almost identical wording (and even defers to the ISO C standard in case of accidental conflict), so there are no additional guarantees in this case when using a POSIX system.

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@svnpenn: larsmans cited the POSIX standard, I cited the C language standard. The C standard to be more authoritative than POSIX. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 28 '12 at 23:35
    
@svnpenn: it cites the C standard. I assumed you're in a POSIX environment since you mentioned POSIX character classes. –  larsmans Oct 28 '12 at 23:35
    
In a POSIX environment, the POSIX standard is more authorative. The C standard is just more widely applicable. –  larsmans Oct 28 '12 at 23:35
1  
@svnpenn: No, not if you want portable code. GNU's C library implementation (glibc) supports the %[A-Z] notation (see the man page, so if you want to limit yourself to glibc, you can use it. I don't know which other C libraries do/do not support it. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 28 '12 at 23:41
1  
I think you'll find most Unix-heritage systems will support variations on the [A-Z], [a-z], [0-9] ranges as 'implementation defined' extensions. That's why the standards both say that if - appears as other than the first or last character, the behaviour is implementation defined. The standards would be cautious about specifying that behaviour because of EBCDIC, and because of issues like [:alpha:] covering many more characters than [A-Za-z] in most code sets. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 28 '12 at 23:44

No, you can't. This is what you can do with []:

The conversion specification includes all subsequent bytes in the format string up to and including the matching <right-square-bracket> (']'). The bytes between the square brackets (the scanlist) comprise the scanset, unless the byte after the <left-square-bracket> is a <circumflex> ('^'), in which case the scanset contains all bytes that do not appear in the scanlist between the and the <right-square-bracket>. If the conversion specification begins with "[]" or "[^]" , the <right-square-bracket> is included in the scanlist and the next <right-square-bracket> is the matching <right-square-bracket> that ends the conversion specification; otherwise, the first <right-square-bracket> is the one that ends the conversion specification. If a '-' is in the scanlist and is not the first character, nor the second where the first character is a '^' , nor the last character, the behavior is implementation-defined.

(POSIX standard for scanf. The C standard has similar wording, see Adam Rosenfield's answer.)

So, depending on the implementation, you might be able to do fscanf(fp, "%[A-Z]", str), but there's no guarantee that that will work on any POSIX system. In any case, [:upper:] is the same as [:epru].

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Thanks @JonathanLeffler, hadn't even noticed the <> parts not displaying –  larsmans Oct 28 '12 at 23:49

Try this:

fscanf(fp, "%[A-Z]", str);
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