Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my Rails template, I'd like to accomplish final HTML to this effect using HAML:

I will first <a href="http://example.com">link somewhere</a>, then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met

The template that comes close:

I will first
= link_to 'link somewhere', 'http://example.com'
- if @condition
  , then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met

You may, however, note that this produces a space between the link and the comma. Is there any practical way to avoid this whitespace? I know there's syntax to remove whitespace around tags, but can this same syntax be applied to just text? I really don't like the solution of extra markup to accomplish this...

Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

9 Answers

up vote 122 down vote accepted

A better way to do this has been introduced via Haml's helpers:

surround

= surround '(', ')' do
  %a{:href => "food"} chicken
Produces:
(<a href='food'>chicken</a>)

succeed:

click
= succeed '.' do
  %a{:href=>"thing"} here
Produces:
click
<a href='thing'>here</a>.

precede:

= precede '*' do
  %span.small Not really
Produces:
*<span class='small'>Not really</span>

To answer the original question:

I will first
= succeed ',' do
  = link_to 'link somewhere', 'http://example.com'
- if @condition
  then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met
Produces:
I will first
<a href="http://example.com">link somewhere</a>,
then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice timing, I just found out about these by reading Haml's source. Apparently they've been around for a while. Odd that they don't document them in the main reference page... –  Groxx Jun 10 '11 at 23:51
1  
Just noticed this new answer. I've been using this technique since I discovered it long after asking this question. Thanks for making this info available for the rest of the world :) –  Matchu Jul 13 '11 at 20:23
1  
Can you expand your answer and show to express the OP's example using these helpers (presumably succeed specifically)? To me it still seems non-obvious and a little ugly: gist.github.com/1665374 –  John Jan 23 '12 at 20:27
1  
John, I updated the answer as suggested. –  Ryan Heneise Feb 15 '12 at 19:18
11  
I feel like I am missing something (while looking on upvotes count), but the succeed variant isn't equivalent to the original one, because trailing comma will be rendered even if @condition == false, which is more ugly than space before this comma. –  Nash Bridges Jun 29 '12 at 6:36
add comment

There's the angle bracket "whitespace munching" syntax, otherwise write a helper method for it.

share|improve this answer
    
How exactly would a helper for that work? Meh, I'll see what I can come up with... –  Matchu Aug 21 '09 at 11:50
    
As for whitespace munching, I can't work out how to make that syntax work if it's not on some sort of tag definition. Am I just doing it wrong, or does that syntax not work without a tag? –  Matchu Aug 21 '09 at 11:51
    
Yeah, I have never been able to get this to work, either. –  Alan H. May 14 '12 at 18:48
add comment

Alright, here's the solution I'm settling on:

Helper

def one_line(&block)
  haml_concat capture_haml(&block).gsub("\n", '').gsub('\\n', "\n")
end

View

I will first
- one_line do
  = link_to 'link somewhere', 'http://example.com'
  - if @condition
    , then render this half of the sentence
    \\n
    if a condition is met

That way, whitespace is excluded by default, but I can still explicitly include it with a "\n" line. (It needs the double-backslash because otherwise HAML interprets it as an actual newline.) Let me know if there's a better option out there!

share|improve this answer
    
Note to world: I eventually wised up and moved these to helpers :P –  Matchu Jan 29 '10 at 18:16
    
Another note to world: these days, I use Groxx's solution :) –  Matchu Jul 14 '11 at 17:26
add comment

Once approach I've taken to this sort of thing is to use string interpolation:

I will first #{link_to 'Link somewhere'}#{', then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met' if condition}

I don't like the look of the literal string in the interpolation, but I've used it with previously declared strings or dynamically generated strings before.

share|improve this answer
    
Mhm. That's my general approach to things like that, but I had never thought of using the conditional in there. It's a shame that the actual template I was using turned out to be a bit more complex than just a second half of a sentence... but that's definitely worth remembering - thanks! –  Matchu Aug 21 '09 at 23:19
add comment

You can also do this using Haml's "trim whitespace" modifier. Inserting > after a Haml declaration will prevent whitespace from being added around it:

I will first
%a{:href => 'http://example.com'}> link somewhere
- if @condition
  , then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met

produces:

I will first<a href='http://example.com'>link somewhere</a>, then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met

However, as you can see, the > modifier also strips the whitespace in front of the link, removing the desired space between the words and the link. I haven't figured a pretty way around this yet, except to add &nbsp; to the end of "I will first", like so:

I will first&nbsp;
%a{:href => 'http://example.com'}> link somewhere
- if @condition
  , then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met

Which finally produces the desired output without lots of hard-to-read interpolation:

I will first&nbsp;<span><a href="http://example.com">link somewhere</a></span>, then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met
share|improve this answer
    
Forgot to mention that I got this from the Haml cheat sheet, which is very helpful: cheat.errtheblog.com/s/haml –  Ryan Heneise Oct 7 '09 at 11:35
3  
It works with tags but not expressions; in your example you've changed his expression to a tag. I have the same issue and unfortunately this is not a solution. –  Teflon Ted Oct 22 '09 at 13:39
    
I would remark that &nbsp; have a special meaning to it, it's not an ordinary whitespace - it's non-breaking whitespace, which means that during word-wrapping browser would do everything to keep words tied with &nbsp; together and this is not always what you want. –  Andrew Feb 3 '13 at 19:44
add comment

Ryan - you can do this to keep the leading space:

%a{:href => 'http://example.com'}>= ' link somewhere'

The space is in the quotes.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm - just realized that doesn't work if underline is on –  thethinman Oct 18 '09 at 4:25
    
This works: &nbsp; %a{:href => 'example.com';}>= 'link somewhere' –  thethinman Oct 18 '09 at 4:28
add comment

Although not well documented, this is cleanly achieved using HAML whitespace preservation (>) combined with an ASCII space (& #32;), and not with helpers:

%a{:href=>'/home'}> Home link
,&#32; 
%a{:href=>'/page'} Next link

This will produce what you want:

<a href='/home'>Anchor text</a>,&#32;
<a href='/page'>More text</a>

But I agree, HAML needs to come up with a better way of doing this, as it does add unnecessary ASCII characters to the page (but it's still more efficient than using helpers).

share|improve this answer
add comment

I came across a similar problem and found this so I thought I would post another solution which doesn't require a helper method. Use Ruby interpolation #{} to wrap the link and if statements:

I will first 
#{link_to 'link somewhere', 'http://example.com'}#{if true : ", then render this half of the sentence if a condition is met" end}

This works in 3.0.18, it may also work in earlier releases.

share|improve this answer
    
Granted, Haml isn't designed for content. This isn't content that we're talking about there, though. It's a template. The author of that blog post is referring to things like writing a full static webpage in Haml, which isn't what I'm doing. The code snippet I provided is pretty much the full .haml file — the fact that it includes a link and a comma doesn't really indicate anything either way. –  Matchu Sep 18 '10 at 22:04
1  
Ah, I see. I've edited my answer, leaving the solution to stand on its own. –  biscuits Sep 19 '10 at 4:57
    
While this may work I think it makes for hard to read markup. Instead just use the HAML whitespace modifiers < and > as other people have mentioned which keeps your HAML clean and readable. –  ToddH Mar 19 '11 at 0:19
add comment

Yet another option that I've used in the past:

- if @condition
  %span> , then some more text after the link.
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.