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Why does the "Cat.prototype = new Mammal()" line below not work inside the Cat() function, but it works outside the Cat() function?

function Mammal() {
  Mammal.prototype.hasHair = function() { return true; }
}

alert( new Mammal().hasHair() ); // dispays true here

function Cat() {
  Cat.prototype = new Mammal();
}

try {
  new Cat().hasHair(); // doesn't work. why?
} catch ( err ) {
  alert('error'); // displays error here
}

Cat.prototype = new Mammal(); // same line as inside Cat() function

alert( new Cat().hasHair() ); // now it works

I tried this with several different javascript implementations, so I doubt it is an implementation idiosyncrasy. I wonder about this mostly out of curiousity, but also just for organization, I would like to define about Cats inside Cat's function, not spread out all over everywhere.

share|improve this question
    
Does it really matter? This is a pattern you should never be using anyway. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 29 '12 at 0:44
    
...but to answer, the second you do new Cat(), you've created an object that inherits from the current prototype object. Then in the constructor you replace the prototype object with a new one. This replacement doesn't affect the object you've already created. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 29 '12 at 0:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because prototype members are passed to the object instance before constructor is executed.

http://jsfiddle.net/vSDbB/

function Mammal() {
  Mammal.prototype.hasHair = function() { return true; }
}

function Cat() {
    Cat.prototype = new Mammal();
}

new Cat();
alert(new Cat().hasHair());

So the code above will work, but if you commented first new Cat(); line it wouldn't since on the new Cat().hasHair() line Cat's prototype doesn't have hasHair() method

share|improve this answer
    
Several people here explained this quite well, But Zerkms answered so succinctly that I had to give the thumbs-up to him. Wish I could choose several answers to accept. –  user1717831 Oct 30 '12 at 4:49
    
@user1717831: haha, the only reason for succinctness is that I cannot express my thoughts well due to lack of English knowledge )) –  zerkms Oct 30 '12 at 6:01

At the moment you execute new Cat, an empty object which inherits from Cat.prototype is created. What is Cat.prototype? It's an empty object since you have not modified it yet.

Inside the constructor, you are assigning Cat.prototype = new Mammal();. The next instance of Cat will inherit from this Mammal instance. Creating a second instance though will also create another Mammal instance, from which the third Cat instance inherits, and so on.

You end up with this inheritance chain (catX is the x-th instance of Cat and mammalX is the x-th instance of Mammal):

cat0 -> Object
cat1 -> mammal0 -> Mammal.prototype
cat2 -> mammal1 -> Mammal.prototype
...

Each Cat instance has its own prototype, which is somehow contrary to what prototypes are used for (sharing common code). It might not look like such a big deal, but it has several consequences, including:

  • Increases memory usage: (nearly) each Cat instance has a corresponding Mammal instance, so you have 2N objects instead of N + 1.
  • Inheritance tests break: instanceof works by comparing prototypes, and since the prototype of cat0 is different than Cat.prototype (after creating multiple instances), cat instanceof Cat will yield false.

The inheritance chain you really want is:

cat0 -> Mammal.prototype
cat1 -> Mammal.prototype
cat2 -> Mammal.prototype
...

Never assign values to the prototype (or overwrite the prototype) inside the constructor function. The constructor function should only set instance specific properties (in some cases you might want to change static properties, but these are less common).

Set up the prototype outside the constructor function:

function Mammal() {}       
Mammal.prototype.hasHair = function() { return true; }

function Cat() {
    Mammal.apply(this, arguments);
}
Cat.prototype = Object.create(Mammal.prototype);
Cat.prototype.constructor = Cat;

Object.create creates an object inheriting from the object you pass as argument. See MDN.

share|improve this answer

I'm slightly confused. What do you actually expect?

You're assigning a function into the prototype chain from Cat, but you do so on invocation of the constructor function. If you call it like new Cat().hasHair(), the object of invocation doesn't know about that function at all.

You need to extend the .prototype before you actually invoke the constructor function.

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The prototype of a function (that acts as a class), is what a new object is copied from when it's created. You shouldn't be setting properties on the prototype in the constructor.

Either this:

function Mammal() {
}
Mammal.prototype.hasHair = function(){ return true };

OR this:

function Mammal() {
    this.hasHair = function(){ return true }
}
share|improve this answer
    
New objects aren't "copied" from their constructor's prototype, they inherit from it. –  RobG Oct 29 '12 at 1:32
    
Thanks, Rob. I was trying to choose a word that conveyed the state of the object relative to its class's prototype at the moment it is instantiated. If you change an object, it doesn't change its prototype. Almost like it's a... hmm, what's the word? –  Steve Oct 29 '12 at 2:49

I edited your code so it can achieve your goal. The following code creates a base class then a sub class in the same style you are attempting to do it.

function Mammal() {
  this.hasHair = function() { return true; }
}

alert( new Mammal().hasHair() ); // dispays true here

function Cat() {
   Mammal.call(this);

}

try {
  alert( new Cat().hasHair() ); // dispays true here
} catch ( err ) {
  alert('error'); // should not fire
}

share|improve this answer

because you are overwriting the prototype on every instantiation. Javascript doesn't really have inheritance.

when you do

function Mammal() {
    Mammal.prototype.hasHair = function() { return true; }
}
new Mammal().hasHair();

it means

  1. use Mammal as a constructor and instantiate a new Mammal type object
  2. overwrite the prototype of Mammal every time you do this

but if you do this:

function Cat() {
}
Cat.prototype = new Mammal();
new Cat().hasHair();

it means

  1. let the Cat constructor's prototype be a new Mammal type object
  2. instantiate a new Cat type object that 'inherited' a hasHair() method through the Mammal 'class'

hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
JavaScript has prototypal inheritance, which is a form of inheritance ;) –  Felix Kling Oct 29 '12 at 1:05
    
@Felix Kling yes yes, my bad, I wasn't specific. I should have wrote doesn't have inheritance in the 'classical sense'? if that's right. –  tenshou Oct 29 '12 at 1:06
    
@tenshou—yes, just delete the second sentence of your answer. –  RobG Oct 29 '12 at 1:30

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