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I have a class that has a static pointer to another class, which is a singleton. The problem that I seem to be getting though is that I cannot set the pointer from within the constructor of said class. Here is my current code:

class B;

class A
{
  public:
    A();
    ~A();
};


class B
{
  public:

    B();
    ~B();

    static A* a;
};

A::A() {
  A* B::a = this;
}

Now, the problem that I seem to be getting is that I cannot define B::a in the "current scope". In addition, the "this" pointer can only be used in a "nonstatic member function".

I think the problem has to do with defining the static class variable within another class function, but I am not sure.

share|improve this question
    
So you want a static member that can be used before the class is instantiated to not be defined until another class is instantiated? –  chris Oct 29 '12 at 3:37
    
What are you asking? I am not sure what you mean. –  user1703993 Oct 29 '12 at 3:39
    
Since B::a is public (in addition to being static), you can do B::a = this; in the constructor of A. But the effect will be that 1) B::a won't be initialised until the first intance of A is created, and 2) Every time a new instance of A is created, B::a will change. Are you sure that is what you want? It sounds extremely unusual. –  jogojapan Oct 29 '12 at 3:43
    
A is a singleton class, meaning it will only be constructed once. It will also be constructed in the beginning of the program, so virtually nothing occurs prior to it. –  user1703993 Oct 29 '12 at 3:46
    
Ok. I would find it a lot more intuitive if B::a was assigned its value in the same place where the one-and-only instance of A is created, rather than from inside A's constructor, but it's certainly possible. The key problem in your code is not the assignment B::a = this, but the fact that there is A * in front of it, which makes it a declaration, rather than an assignment. –  jogojapan Oct 29 '12 at 3:49

2 Answers 2

First of all, static class members have to be defined as well as declared. static A* a; in the body of class B is merely a declaration, and you need to define a. Note that every class member must have a single definition, that's why we usually define static members in the appropriate .cpp files for classes. Obviously, this happens outside of the class body. You also cannot define a static member in scope of a function.

So, move the definition of a outside of the constructor's scope, like this:

class B
{
public:

    B();
    ~B();

    static A* a;};

A* B::a = 0; // Good idea to set a default value for the pointer

Note, however, that the value of a will contain a 0 until at least one object of type A is created.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I get it. I didn't know you had to define the static variable twice. –  user1703993 Oct 29 '12 at 3:49
    
Note that you actually define a static variable only once. The answers to this question stackoverflow.com/questions/1410563/… will help you better understand the difference between declaration and definition :) –  gridz Oct 29 '12 at 3:53

You should define all static members outside the class declaration:

class B;
class A
{
public:
    A();
    ~A();
};


class B
{
public:

    B();
    ~B();

    static A* a;
};

A* B::a; // HERE

A::A()
{
    B::a = this; // and there was an error here too
}

Don't forget to define the other ctors/dtors.

share|improve this answer
    
I think what you mean is definition, not declaration. –  gridz Oct 29 '12 at 3:45
    
@Grigory: Indeed! –  Murilo Vasconcelos Oct 29 '12 at 3:48

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