Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created a 404 page and am currently testing it with a simple page request that I know does not exist. This code will show the error page I have made (aka the result I want).

<!-- CONFIGURATION FOR ERROR PAGES -->
<error-page>
    <!--<exception-type>java.lang.Throwable</exception-type>-->
    <error-code>404</error-code>
    <location>/videoNotFound</location>
</error-page>

However, this code will show the apache tomcat default error page

<!-- CONFIGURATION FOR ERROR PAGES -->
<error-page>
    <exception-type>java.lang.Throwable</exception-type>
    <!--<error-code>404</error-code>-->
    <location>/videoNotFound</location>
</error-page>

Any ideas why this is occurring, or what I could try to maybe fix this problem? Even though option 1 works, I prefer option 2 because I do not want to have a specific error page for each exception type.

share|improve this question
    
by apache tomcat default error page you mean default 404 page right ? or 500 internal server error ? can you see any exception trace in your tomcat console ? and can you confirm what http status code you are receiving –  mzzzzb Oct 29 '12 at 4:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

404 and java.lang.Throwable are two very different error conditions triggered under different circumstances. the 404 like you've tested yourself is triggered by requesting a non-existent/unreachable resource and the java.lang.Throwable is an error condition that occurs as a result of an internal server/programming error, and it's represented by the http status code 500. This condition, you cannot simulate by simply accessing an unreachable resource; the nature of 4xx status codes generally is that they're thrown before the request even gets to your web application while the 500 series error codes are mostly web app generated. The only way to test for this is to throw an instance of throwable Exception or Error within your web application code.

In the end, you will have to have two separate error-page definitions, one for container-related errors (essentially the 4xx status codes) and another for the 500/throwable type error conditions

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.