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I am trying to create a server listener. It sits back and waits for data coming from the client and performs setting actions due to the nature of the data. But right now, after receiving the first data stream, it goes into a resource hog, the memory usage shoots up and the CPU usage is maxing out a single core.

1 - How can I fix this? How can I make it listen without all the resource hog, as you can see it is a really really small program.

2 - The client itself that sends these data streams, runs once. It starts up, connects to the server, sends the data and quits. While the server is still "on", if I retry running the client again, the server doesn't receive the data.

Server Code:

package mediaserver;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

public class Main {
    ServerSocket ss;
    Socket s;
    BufferedReader br;

    public Main() throws IOException{
        ss = new ServerSocket(1111);
        s = ss.accept();
        br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(s.getInputStream()));
        new Thread(new runner()).start();
    }

    class runner implements Runnable{

        public void run(){
          while(true){
            try {
                String n = br.readLine();
                System.out.println(n);
            } catch (IOException ex) {
            }
             finally{
                 try {
                       s.close();
                       ss.close();
                    } catch (IOException ex) {
                    }

             }
          }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        new Main();
    }

}

Client Code

package mediaserver;

import java.io.BufferedWriter;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.OutputStreamWriter;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;

public class test {
public static void main(String [] args) throws UnknownHostException, IOException, InterruptedException{
    Socket s = new Socket("127.0.0.1", 1111);
    BufferedWriter bw = new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(s.getOutputStream()));
    bw.write("");
    bw.newLine();
    bw.flush();

    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Just press Pause in the debugger and check what it's doing. –  Codo Oct 29 '12 at 6:41
1  
This is what debuggers are for. Time to learn one. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Oct 29 '12 at 7:32

2 Answers 2

The server never gets the data on additional run because ss.accept() is only called one time. You need to wrap this in a loop:

s = ss.accept();
br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(s.getInputStream()));
new Thread(new runner()).start();
share|improve this answer

The following piece of code is an infinite loop:

while(true) {
    try {
        String n = br.readLine();
        System.out.println(n);
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        throw new RuntimeException(ex);
    }
    finally {
        ...
    }
}

Once the client disconnects, the BufferedReader instance will encounter the end-of-file and readLine will return null. The loop then will continue to print null infinitely.

The fix it, check for null:

while(true) {
    try {
        String n = br.readLine();
        if (n == null)
            break;
        System.out.println(n);
    } catch (IOException ex) {
    }
    finally {
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've added the null fix. But the resource usage is still high. –  Mob Oct 29 '12 at 6:55
    
Have you looked at it in the debugger? –  Codo Oct 29 '12 at 9:36
1  
Add some logging to the empty catch block or move it out of the while loop. –  Michael Krussel Oct 29 '12 at 17:45
    
Good point. I've changed my code. –  Codo Oct 29 '12 at 22:01
    
@Mob: Please add the additional code in the catch block. It could result in an infinite loop as well. –  Codo Oct 29 '12 at 22:02

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