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This was an interview question:

Given a sequence of n numbers (n can be any number, assume n <= 100 for this question), say for eg. 11, 23, 9, 17, 20, 8, 5, 6 . Problem is to write a recursive function in C to add each number in the sequence to get the sum. If this sum is of more than one digit then sum the digits again and again if the sum is of more than one digit then sum the digits again. Follow this process until the sum is reduced to one digit no. Now add all the sums obtained in the process to output the final sum.

For illustration take above sequence: 11, 23, 9, 17, 20, 8, 5, 6

SUM(11, 23, 9, 17, 20, 8, 5, 6) = 99 => SUM(9, 9) = 18 => SUM(1, 8) = 9

Now add all the sums obtained, i.e. SUM(99, 18, 9) = 126 <== should be the output.

Please note that the function should be a recursive function in C.

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is this for project euler? –  Kip Aug 21 '09 at 12:49
    
Gonna have to re-think that nic - "good question"? Hardly. –  duffymo Aug 21 '09 at 12:49
    
this isn't for a project and neither is it a homework. got it worngly tagged –  good question Aug 21 '09 at 12:54
    
int RememberMe(int value){return RememberMe(RememberMe(value));} void main(){RememberMe(input);} –  Jon Aug 21 '09 at 12:54
2  
I'd recommend editing your post so it is a question, adding that you were posed this in an interview. –  luke Aug 21 '09 at 13:18

7 Answers 7

Not sure about C, but the algorithm would look similar to this.

SUM(1, 2, ... n) = 1 + SUM(2, ... n) and so on to get the total, then repeat once the final number is found to be more than one digit.

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That's the simple bit :) –  pjp Aug 21 '09 at 14:08
    
heh, i know. I don't code C though. I assume the question-asker knows more about that side of things, so i just answered with an example algorthim. –  Jimmeh Aug 21 '09 at 14:40

Here's an Erlang implementation you could use as a guide

-module('summation').  
-export([start/1]).  

sumlist(List)->
  lists:foldl(fun(X, Sum) -> X + Sum end, 0, List). << Inherently recursive

num_to_list(Value) ->
  Str = integer_to_list(Value),
  lists:map(fun(X) -> X - 48 end, Str).  << Inherently recursive

accumulate([_H], List) ->
  io:fwrite("~w~n", [List]),
  List;
accumulate(Value, List) ->
  Tmp = sumlist(Value),
  accumulate(num_to_list(Tmp), [Tmp|List]).  % << Recurse here

start(List)->
  Value = accumulate(List, []),
  sumlist(Value).

testing

25> c(summation).
{ok,summation}
26> summation:start([11, 23, 9, 17, 20, 8, 5, 6]).
[9,18,99]
126
27>
share|improve this answer
#include "stdafx.h"

#include <stdio.h>

#include <stdlib.h>

const int n = 8;

int sumDigits(int x)
{
    int d = 0;

    while (x != 0)
    {
    	d += x % 10;
    	x /= 10;
    }

    return d;
}

int sumArr(int* a, int start)
{
    return (start == n)? 0: a[start] + sumArr(a, start + 1);
}

int sum(int x)
{
    return (x < 10)? x: x + sum(sumDigits(x));
}

int main(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int* a = new int[n];
    a[0] = 11; a[1] = 23; a[2] = 9; a[3] = 17; a[4] = 20; a[5] = 8; a[6] = 5; a[7] = 6;
    //for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) a[i] = rand() % 100;
    //for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) printf("a[%d] = %d\n", i, a[i]);

    printf("sum = %d\n", sum(sumArr(a, 0)));

    return 0;
}

This outputs: sum = 126

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Here's a Scala implementation:

def sum(lst: List[Int]): Int = {
    val sum1 = lst.reduceLeft(_+_)
    println(sum1)
    sum1 match {
       case nb if nb < 10 => sum1
       case _ => {
            val lst2 = sum1.toString.toList.map(_.toString).map(Integer.parseInt(_))
            sum1 + sum(lst2)
       }
    }

}

val lst = List(11, 23, 9, 17, 20, 8, 5, 6)
val totalSum = sum(lst)
println(totalSum)

Result:

99
18
9
126

I'm really beginning to love, how concise Scala is.

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As others had said : the point here is to understand the recursion.

There are 3 place we can use recursion :

  • sum all the digits in a Integral number:

    sum_digital :: (Integral a) => a -> a
    sum_digital d
       | d < 10     = d
       | otherwise  = d `mod` 10 + sum_digital (d `div` 10)
    
  • chain all the sums from a start value and the rules

    chain :: (Integral a) => a -> [a]
    chain a 
        | a < 10 = [a]
        | otherwise = a : chain (sum_digital a)
    
  • final one. sum of a list

    mySum :: (Integral a) => [a]-> a
    mySum [] = 0
    mySum (x:xs) = x + mySum xs
    

Put all these together:

*Main> mySum $ chain $ mySum [11, 23, 9, 17, 20, 8, 5, 6]    
126

The C version is left for you as the exercise:)

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I just want to add this one to 77v's answer in order to make everything hardcore recursive as possible. I know this is a year ago already, and his C++ solution works quite nice already. But I really had no fun that I though I can make that one last function called sumDigits in to recursion. So to rid myself of boredom, here it is:

long sumDigits(long x, long d = 0)
{
    if (x != 0)
    {
        d = x % 10;
        return d + sumDigits(x / 10, d);
    }
    else
        return 0;
}

It's the same, 7 lines long and accepts one argument. Note that the second one is defaulted to 0. It's used as a memory for the recursion itself. The user may ignore that second argument entirely. The function is also used the same way as 77v's implementation. You can in fact directly replace his function with this one. Hence making all the function in his solution recursion based. Which makes an already awesome work more awesome! Lol! :D

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int sumArrayAndDigitsThereOf(int* arr, int len, int idx, int sum)
{
    if(!arr)
        return -1;
    if(idx < len)
    {
        sum += arr[idx];
        return sumArrayAndDigitsThereOf(arr, len, idx+1, sum);
    }
    else if(sum/10 > 0)
    {
        int rem = sum%10;
        sum /= 10;
        sum += rem;
        return sumArrayAndDigitsThereOf(arr, len, idx, sum);
    }
    return sum;
}
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