Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

my code will be display me That is not an acceptable input. if I insert negative number. then proceed to prompt the input. But it continue to calculate. this is part of my code contains something wrong. but i did not see.

public static boolean checkOctal()
{
    boolean b = true;
    if (oct < 0 && oct > 99999999 )
    {
        b = false;
        System.out.println("That is not an acceptable input.");
    }
    int tmp;
    int tmp1 = oct;
    while (tmp1 > 0)
    {
        tmp = tmp1 % 10;
        tmp1 = tmp1 / 10;
        if (tmp >= 0 && tmp < 8)
        {
            continue;
        } else
        {
            b = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    return b;

}
share|improve this question
1  
Wow, you really need to learn how to write more readable code. Where does oct come from? –  wliao Oct 29 '12 at 7:53
    
sorry, this is only part of the wrong result and now it is solved –  Bolor Ch Oct 29 '12 at 7:58

3 Answers 3

you should write

if (oct < 0 || oct > 99999999 )

instead of

if (oct < 0 && oct > 99999999 )

|| stands for or, while && for and.

share|improve this answer
    
if you can find a number that's smaller than 0 and greater than 99999999 in the same time, you just might reinvent math :) Kidding. The problem is where onemach said, but it would be a good practice to put some extra brackets like: if ((oct < 0) && (oct > 99999999 )) –  QuadroQ Oct 29 '12 at 7:55
3  
@QuadroQ: I disagree - while extra brackets can be useful sometimes, they can also be distracting - and in this case I'd definitely consider them more harmful than helpful. –  Jon Skeet Oct 29 '12 at 7:57
    
It's not and agree/disagree situation. It's a coding convention recommended by Oracle. You can take a look here: oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/documentation/… (section 10.1) –  QuadroQ Oct 29 '12 at 8:13
    
This still isn't the full solution if the number is higher then 99999999, it will still calculate. Still an else missing for it to stop the while loop. –  Lyrion Oct 29 '12 at 8:17
    
@RafaelCelerier yes, let Bolor Ch finish~ –  onemach Oct 29 '12 at 8:19

Actually, I doubt that it's displaying anything. Look at the condition:

if (oct < 0 && oct > 99999999 )

How can a number be negative and largely positive at the same time? You want an "or" condition.

Next, look at what you're doing if you did meet the condition:

{
    b = false;
    System.out.println("That is not an acceptable input.");
}

You're just keeping going - it will return the right result (false) but it's pointless. You know the result already, so why not just return it?

You want:

if (oct < 0 || oct > 99999999 )
{
    System.out.println("That is not an acceptable input.");
    return false;
}

Or, better yet, perform the validation earlier (before calling the method) - and throw an exception if the input is invalid. Currently you're giving the same result for "invalid input" as for "valid but non-octal input" which doesn't sound like a good idea to me.

Note that the approach of "return as soon as you know the value" is one I'd take for the rest of the method too - I wouldn't bother with a b variable at all. I'd change your loop to something like this:

int value = oct;
while (value > 0)
{
    int digit = value % 10;
    if (digit >= 8)
    {
        return false;
    }
    value = value / 10;
}
return true;

You don't need to worry about digit being negative, as you've already checked that you started off with a non-negative value.

Additionally, it seems odd that this method doesn't have oct as a parameter. That would make it more self-contained.

share|improve this answer

You should probably check your boolean logic:

if (oct < 0 && oct > 99999999 )

will never be true - no number is less than zero and larger than 999999 at the same time... The symbol || (logical "or") is what you need instead.

Cheers,

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.