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I recently was asked this question in an interview and would like to hear the answer from you people. I discussed about code resuability and security that can be achieved by encapsulation and inheritance but the interviewer did not seem satisfied. He insisted on how exactly an application user is benefited by using applications developed on the principles of oop.

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Depends. Purists (and morons) will apply abstraction to every possible bit of code they generate or come across. This is completely unnecessary in something as simple as a direct, simple MySQL call from within a tiny bit of PHP, to log site accesses, for instance.

However, generally OOP can save you plenty of cycles if applied systematically to big data involving lots of information shuffling, like sorting hundreds of rows of data on every page access. It's a matter of when to use OOP and when to just write procedural code. OOP takes time and effort and is maintainable by experienced programmers, but you need to ask yourself if it is worth all that extra hassle on a tiny snippet of code that does one thing internally.

There are plenty of good articles out there (http://berryllium.nl/2011/02/getters-and-setters-evil-or-necessary-evil/) that help you to understand WHY OOP is sometimes unnecessary and in fact harmful.

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