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I am reading a JSON like this:

[
  {
    "Low": 8.63,
    "Volume": 14211900,
    "Date": "2012-10-26",
    "High": 8.79,
    "Close": 8.65,
    "Adj Close": 8.65,
    "Open": 8.7
  },
  {
    "Low": 8.65,
    "Volume": 12167500,
    "Date": "2012-10-25",
    "High": 8.81,
    "Close": 8.73,
    "Adj Close": 8.73,
    "Open": 8.76
  },
  {
    "Low": 8.68,
    "Volume": 20239700,
    "Date": "2012-10-24",
    "High": 8.92,
    "Close": 8.7,
    "Adj Close": 8.7,
    "Open": 8.85
  },
  {
    "Low": 8.78,
    "Volume": 23433900,
    "Date": "2012-10-23",
    "High": 8.94,
    "Close": 8.78,
    "Adj Close": 8.78,
    "Open": 8.93
  }
]

Using this:

json = File.read("#{symbols[0]}.json")

Then doing this:

result = JSON.parse(json)

Then, when I want to select the first value for the key value "Low", I did this:

puts result[0]['Low']

This returned 58.75 (correct).

But I want to get the first three values for "Low". I tried doing the following, but it doesn't work (says can't convert string to integer). Why?

puts result[0..2]['Low']
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1  
What you posted is neither a hash nor an array. What exactly do you have? –  Sergio Tulentsev Oct 29 '12 at 9:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
results = [
  {"Low"=>58.75, "Volume"=>163200, "Date"=>"1962-02-01", "High"=>59.63, "Close"=>59.38, "Adj Close"=>0.61, "Open"=>59.63},
  {"Low"=>59.63, "Volume"=>134400, "Date"=>"1962-01-31", "High"=>60.0, "Close"=>59.75, "Adj Close"=>0.62, "Open"=>59.88},
  {"Low"=>59.13, "Volume"=>91200, "Date"=>"1962-01-26", "High"=>59.38, "Close"=>59.38, "Adj Close"=>0.61, "Open"=>59.13},
  {"Low"=>59.13, "Volume"=>91200, "Date"=>"1962-01-25", "High"=>59.88, "Close"=>59.13, "Adj Close"=>0.61, "Open"=>59.75},
  {"Low"=>58.5, "Volume"=>110400, "Date"=>"1962-01-24", "High"=>60.13, "Close"=>59.75, "Adj Close"=>0.62, "Open"=>60.13}
]
results[0..2].collect {|element| element['Low']}
>> [58.75, 59.63, 59.13]
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1  
Or this one, yes :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Oct 29 '12 at 9:32
    
what's better different between the two? Eventually, I want to be able to calculate moving averages (will be using the simple statistics gem, though I know there are various ruby ways). So will be requiring something like (if you are at [0], add up [0..9] and divide by 10 - then add key ('10 Day SMA') and value, then go to [1], add up [1..10] and divide by 10, etc, etc.) –  gcubed Oct 29 '12 at 9:48
2  
I prefer this. Sergio's way works fine but I think using map or collect directly on your subarray is a bit more Rubyish than doing it with indexes (which is a little more like the for loop you might use to do the same thing in other languages). For moving averages, you might want to take a look at the each_cons function in the docs... results.each_cons(10) {|items| calculate average... } –  Andy H Oct 29 '12 at 9:56
    
I'll do that, thanks Andy –  gcubed Oct 29 '12 at 10:00
    
@Andy Thanks so much for showing each_cons - great stuff! –  gcubed Oct 29 '12 at 16:43

Assuming that you have array of hashes, you can do this:

results = [
  {"Low"=>58.75, "Volume"=>163200, "Date"=>"1962-02-01", "High"=>59.63, "Close"=>59.38, "Adj Close"=>0.61, "Open"=>59.63},
  {"Low"=>59.63, "Volume"=>134400, "Date"=>"1962-01-31", "High"=>60.0, "Close"=>59.75, "Adj Close"=>0.62, "Open"=>59.88},
  {"Low"=>59.13, "Volume"=>91200, "Date"=>"1962-01-26", "High"=>59.38, "Close"=>59.38, "Adj Close"=>0.61, "Open"=>59.13},
  {"Low"=>59.13, "Volume"=>91200, "Date"=>"1962-01-25", "High"=>59.88, "Close"=>59.13, "Adj Close"=>0.61, "Open"=>59.75},
  {"Low"=>58.5, "Volume"=>110400, "Date"=>"1962-01-24", "High"=>60.13, "Close"=>59.75, "Adj Close"=>0.62, "Open"=>60.13}
]

(0..2).map {|idx| results[idx]['Low']} # => [58.75, 59.63, 59.13]
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Thanks again Sergio, I could sure use you as a tutor! –  gcubed Oct 29 '12 at 9:40

The reason it doesn't work is that

  • results[0] returns a single hash (which you can then index with a string ['key'])
  • results[0..2] returns another (smaller) array of hashes (which you need to index with an integer to get a single hash).

Using the map function (docs) allows you to get the values you're after. Note that it's aliased to collect so you can use whatever you prefer. In this case you are collecting a set of values so that might be the best conceptual fit.

results[0..2].map {|hash| hash['Low']}
# or equivalently
results[0..2].collect {|hash| hash['Low']}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Andy, I appreciate the explanation –  gcubed Oct 29 '12 at 9:52

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