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I have the following based on another SE question ( Hash Rings On PostgreSql)

CREATE TABLE sms.tablename
(
  id uuid,
  mdate date
)

And the partitions.

CREATE TABLE sms.tablename_partition_1 ( CHECK ( sms.hash(id) = '1' ) ) INHERITS (sms.tablename);
...
CREATE TABLE sms.tablename_partition_f ( CHECK ( sms.hash(id) = 'f' ) ) INHERITS (sms.tablename);

Now here is the problems.

When i add this trigger.

CREATE TRIGGER "delete_me"
  BEFORE DELETE
  ON sms.tablename
  FOR EACH ROW
  EXECUTE PROCEDURE sms.delete_me(E'\\x');

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION sms.delete_me()
  RETURNS trigger AS
$BODY$

begin

    RAISE NOTICE 'HERE !!!';
    return OLD;

end;
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE SECURITY DEFINER
  COST 100;

This trigger never runs ... I can't see the NOTICE message. Now if i apply the same trigger to another table ( Non-Partitioned ), it works fine it does its job , the row is removed and the notice message pops up.

More Info : "PostgreSQL 9.1.6 on i686-pc-linux-gnu, compiled by gcc-4.4.real (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5.1) 4.4.3, 32-bit"

I'm just trying to avoid using stored procedures on the table and keeping the ORM Clean.

EDITED :

1) No Rules Exist On The Table Or Any Of the Tables Inherited , The Same Applied to Indexes Or PK's.

2) Running the following command.

DELETE FROM sms.tablename WHERE id = 'a5e52a04-282f-4cf4-8347-a43d68725e6b';

3) Full SQL Showing This Problem.

http://pastebin.com/mZBFEtaY
share|improve this question
    
Thanks for showing your Pg version and for using a non-ancient one. It'd help if you'd show the SQL that you run that you expect to fire the trigger, but fails to. Also, are there any RULEs on the partitions? Rules interact with triggers in exciting ways. Note that triggers aren't inherited, so a trigger on tablename won't fire on direct access to tablename_partition_1. –  Craig Ringer Oct 29 '12 at 9:57
    
Hello Craig. I just updated my question :) , thanks for your help :) –  PythonWolf Oct 29 '12 at 10:09
    
If there are no rules, are you using trigger-based partitioning, with another trigger on sms.tablename for the partitioning? –  Craig Ringer Oct 29 '12 at 10:11
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The delete trigger fires on the child table that contains the row, not the parent. You must add the trigger to each child table.

DO                                                                
$$
DECLARE
  h text;
BEGIN
  FOR h IN SELECT to_hex(x) FROM generate_series(0,15) x LOOP
    EXECUTE format('CREATE TRIGGER "DeleteRedirector" BEFORE DELETE ON pproblem.%I FOR EACH ROW EXECUTE PROCEDURE pproblem.delete_me('''');',
                   'tablename_partition_'||h);
  END LOOP;
END;
$$;

Demo:

regress=# begin;
BEGIN
regress=# DELETE FROM pproblem.tablename;
NOTICE:  HERE !!!
NOTICE:  HERE !!!
NOTICE:  HERE !!!
DELETE 3
regress=# rollback;
ROLLBACK
share|improve this answer
    
Hello Craig. Thanks for all the work , its working now , i may add its extremely weird that it "works this way" but after a few EXPLAIN ANALYSE i got it !, apparently when we have conditions PG will first "HUNT" for the tables that have the data and then perform the DELETE using the table local triggers. I always assumed that it would use the Parent Table native triggers and i was wrong :). More points for you a new blog reader is what you got , thanks ! –  PythonWolf Oct 30 '12 at 9:27
    
@PythonWolf That's correct, see the documentation for constraint_exclusion. And yeah, it's just another way PostgreSQL's partitioning is weird and hacky. –  Craig Ringer Oct 30 '12 at 10:17
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What's happening here may be that your trigger is interacting in an unexpected way with another trigger or a rule.

If an earlier trigger DELETEs from a partition then does a RETURN NULL to prevent the action from being applied to the base table its self, later triggers do not fire because the action has been cancelled (and redirected, but the later triggers don't know that).

A similar but more confusing situation arises with views, where DO INSTEAD mean queries get rewritten so they never refer to the base table in the first place.

If you're using triggers on partitioned tables, you'll want to create them on each partition as well as the main table, or be careful about your trigger ordering. Triggers are run as BEFORE triggers then AFTER triggers in alphabetical order of trigger name.

Given DDL:

create table demo (id integer);

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION cancel_tg() RETURNS trigger AS $$
BEGIN
  RETURN NULL;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE;

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION notice_tg() RETURNS trigger AS $$
BEGIN
  RAISE NOTICE 'Trigger fired';
  -- This just makes it a no-op:
  IF tg_op = 'INSERT' OR tg_op = 'DELETE' THEN
    RETURN NEW;
  ELSE
    RETURN OLD;
  END IF;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE;

the cancelling trigger before the notice trigger produces no message:

regress=> CREATE TRIGGER aa_cancel 
          BEFORE INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE ON demo
          FOR EACH ROW EXECUTE PROCEDURE cancel_tg();
CREATE TRIGGER
regress=> CREATE TRIGGER bb_notice
          BEFORE INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE ON demo 
          FOR EACH ROW EXECUTE PROCEDURE notice_tg();
CREATE TRIGGER
regress=> insert into demo values (1);
INSERT 0 0

The other way around fires the notice, because aa_notice fires before bb_cancel:

regress=> drop trigger bb_notice on demo;
DROP TRIGGER
regress=> drop trigger aa_cancel on demo;
DROP TRIGGER
regress=> CREATE TRIGGER aa_notice
          BEFORE INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE ON demo
          FOR EACH ROW EXECUTE PROCEDURE notice_tg();
CREATE TRIGGER
regress=> CREATE TRIGGER bb_cancel
          BEFORE INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE ON demo 
          FOR EACH ROW EXECUTE PROCEDURE cancel_tg();
CREATE TRIGGER
regress=> insert into demo values (1);
NOTICE:  Trigger fired
INSERT 0 0

This means that AFTER triggers will never fire on tables that use trigger partitioning, and BEFORE triggers must be alphabetically before the partitioning trigger. Yet another way in which partitioning in PostgreSQL is a bit of an ugly hack...

share|improve this answer
    
Hello Craig. I don't know if this is a trigger interaction anyway i pasted a full SQL of this behavior from schema creation to all the steps necessary. It's here pastebin.com/mZBFEtaY . I can only imagine this could be a bug in the trigger processing since I'm not hacking the triggers or something like that it looks pretty ... well normal. –  PythonWolf Oct 29 '12 at 10:52
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