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I have a table for users:

USERS:
ID   |   NAME  | 
----------------
1    |   JOHN  |
2    |   STEVE |

a table for computers:

COMPUTERS:
ID   |   USER_ID |
------------------
13   |     1     |
14   |     1     |

a table for processors:

PROCESSORS:
ID   |   NAME             |
---------------------------
27   |   PROCESSOR TYPE 1 |
28   |   PROCESSOR TYPE 2 |

and a table for harddrives:

HARDDRIVES:
ID   |   NAME              |
---------------------------|
35   |   HARDDRIVE TYPE 25 |
36   |   HARDDRIVE TYPE 90 |

Each computer can have many attributes from the different attributes tables (processors, harddrives etc), so I have intersection tables like this, to link the attributes to the computers:

COMPUTER_PROCESSORS:
C_ID |  P_ID  |
--------------|
13   |   27   |
13   |   28   |
14   |   27   |

COMPUTER_HARDDRIVES:
C_ID |  H_ID  |
--------------|
13   |   35   |

So user JOHN, with id 1 owns computer 13 and 14. Computer 13 has processor 27 and 28, and computer 13 has harddrive 35. Computer 14 has processor 27 and no harddrive.

Given a user's id, I would like to retrieve a list of that user's computers with each computers attributes.

I have figured out a query that gives me a somewhat of a result:

SELECT computers.id, processors.id AS p_id, processors.name AS p_name, harddrives.id AS h_id, harddrives.name AS h_name,
FROM computers

JOIN computer_processors ON (computer_processors.c_id = computers.id) 
JOIN processors ON (processors.id = computer_processors.p_id)

JOIN computer_harddrives ON (computer_harddrives.c_id = computers.id) 
JOIN harddrives ON (harddrives.id = computer_harddrives.h_id)

WHERE computers.user_id = 1

Result:

ID   | P_ID | P_NAME           | H_ID | H_NAME            |
-----------------------------------------------------------
13   |  27  | PROCESSOR TYPE 1 |  35  | HARDDRIVE TYPE 25 |
13   |  28  | PROCESSOR TYPE 2 |  35  | HARDDRIVE TYPE 25 |

But this has several problems...

  1. Computer 14 doesnt show up, because it has no harddrive. Can I somehow make an OUTER JOIN to make sure that all computers show up, even if there a some attributes they don't have?

  2. Computer 13 shows up twice, with the same harddrive listet for both. When more attributes are added to a computer (like 3 blocks of ram), the number of rows returned for that computer gets pretty big, and it makes it had to sort the result out in application code. Can I somehow make a query, that groups the two returned rows together? Or a query that returns NULL in the h_name column in the second row, so that all values returned are unique?

EDIT: What I would like to return is something like this:

ID   | P_ID | P_NAME           | H_ID | H_NAME            |
-----------------------------------------------------------
13   |  27  | PROCESSOR TYPE 1 |  35  | HARDDRIVE TYPE 25 |
13   |  28  | PROCESSOR TYPE 2 |  35  | NULL              |
14   |  27  | PROCESSOR TYPE 1 | NULL | NULL              |

Or whatever result that make it easy to turn it into an array like this

[13] =>
    [P_NAME] =>
         [0] => PROCESSOR TYPE 1
         [1] => PROCESSOR TYPE 2
    [H_NAME] =>
         [0] => HARDDRIVE TYPE 25


[14] =>
    [P_NAME] =>
         [0] => PROCESSOR TYPE 1
share|improve this question
    
how do you link computers,processors and harddrives tables as i dont see any common column –  AnandPhadke Oct 29 '12 at 9:58
    
can you display the final result that you wanted to get? –  John Woo Oct 29 '12 at 10:00
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use LEFT JOIN instead of INNER JOIN. The two joins are different from each other. The INNER JOIN (which you are currently using) only returns the records which both has at least one match on either side of the table. And that is why computer 14 won't should because it has no match on table COMPUTER_HARDDRIVES. LEFT JOIN on the other hand, returns all records on the left hand side table whether it no match on the other side of the tables.

SELECT  a.ID AS UserID,
        a.Name as UserName,
        b.ID as ComputerID,
        d.ID as ProcessorID,
        d.Name as ProcessorName,
        f.ID as HardDriveID,
        f.name as HardDriveName
FROM    users a
        INNER JOIN computers b
            ON a.ID = b.user_ID
        LEFT JOIN computer_processors c
            ON b.ID = c.C_ID
        LEFT JOIN PROCESSORS d
            ON c.p_ID = d.ID
        LEFT JOIN COMPUTER_HARDDRIVES e
            ON b.ID = e.c_ID
        LEFT JOIN HARDDRIVE f
            ON e.h_ID = f.ID
WHERE   a.ID = 1

and since you want to groupt the rows together, youcan take advantage of GROUP_CONCAT() function. basically, what it does is it combines the value of the columns into comma separated value

SELECT  a.ID AS UserID,
        a.Name as UserName,
        b.ID as ComputerID,
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT d.ID) as ProcessorID,
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT d.Name) as ProcessorName,
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT f.ID) as HardDriveID,
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT f.name) as HardDriveName
FROM    users a
        INNER JOIN computers b
            ON a.ID = b.user_ID
        LEFT JOIN computer_processors c
            ON b.ID = c.C_ID
        LEFT JOIN PROCESSORS d
            ON c.p_ID = d.ID
        LEFT JOIN COMPUTER_HARDDRIVES e
            ON b.ID = e.c_ID
        LEFT JOIN HARDDRIVE f
            ON e.h_ID = f.ID
WHERE   a.ID = 1
GROUP BY UserID, UserName, ComputerID
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for your help, both approaches work beautifully! I'm a litte worried about the GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT...) though, since it uses a comma to separate the values, and some of the values in my columns can potentially already have a comma (like 'processor type 25, xx'), and then it will be very hard to sort from there. I think I will go with the first approach and then sort everything in application code. Which one of the approaches would you choose? –  acrmuui Oct 29 '12 at 11:57
    
actually you don't have to worry about the separator because you can change it and you can also sort it inside group_concat. Click here for demo. –  John Woo Oct 29 '12 at 11:59
    
    
That's nice, thank you very much for showing! –  acrmuui Oct 29 '12 at 13:14
    
@krismeld you're welcome :D glad it helped you. –  John Woo Oct 29 '12 at 13:16
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Try:

SELECT computers.id, 
       group_concat(distinct processors.id) AS p_ids, 
       group_concat(distinct processors.name) AS p_names, 
       group_concat(distinct harddrives.id) AS h_ids, 
       group_concat(distinct harddrives.name) AS h_names
FROM computers
JOIN computer_processors ON (computer_processors.c_id = computers.id) 
JOIN processors ON (processors.id = computer_processors.p_id)
LEFT JOIN computer_harddrives ON (computer_harddrives.c_id = computers.id) 
LEFT JOIN harddrives ON (harddrives.id = computer_harddrives.h_id)
WHERE computers.user_id = 1
group by computers.id
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your help! –  acrmuui Oct 29 '12 at 11:58
add comment
SELECT computers.id, processors.id AS p_id, processors.name AS p_name, harddrives.id AS h_id, harddrives.name AS h_name
FROM computers

LEFT JOIN computer_processors ON (computer_processors.c_id = computers.id) 
LEFT JOIN processors ON (processors.id = computer_processors.p_id)

LEFT JOIN computer_harddrives ON (computer_harddrives.c_id = computers.id) 
LEFT JOIN harddrives ON (harddrives.id = computer_harddrives.h_id)

WHERE computers.user_id = 1
share|improve this answer
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select u.ID user_id,
       u.name user_name
       p.id,
       p.name,
       h.id,
       h.name
from USERS u join COMPUTERS c
on u.id=c.USER_ID
join PROCESSORS p
on c.id=p.id
join HARDDRIVES h
on c.id=h.id
where u.id=1
share|improve this answer
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