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How can I find the number of occurrences of a character in a string?

For example: The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.

Some example outputs are below,

'a' = 1
'o' = 4
'space' = 8
'.' = 1
share|improve this question
2  
What have you tried? That wouldn't be that tough. – Rohit Jain Oct 29 '12 at 10:37
3  
What have you tried? – Azodious Oct 29 '12 at 10:37
4  
Is this a homework? – Thinhbk Oct 29 '12 at 10:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted
import java.io.*;
public class CountChar 
{

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
    {
      String ch;
      BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
      System.out.print("Enter the Statement:");
      ch=br.readLine();
      int count=0,len=0;
        do
        {  
          try
          {
          char name[]=ch.toCharArray();
              len=name.length;
              count=0;
              for(int j=0;j<len;j++)
               {
                  if((name[0]==name[j])&&((name[0]>=65&&name[0]<=91)||(name[0]>=97&&name[0]<=123))) 
                      count++;
               }
              if(count!=0)
                System.out.println(name[0]+" "+count+" Times");
              ch=ch.replace(""+name[0],"");          
          }
          catch(Exception ex){}
        }
        while(len!=1);
   }

}

Output

Enter the Statement:asdf23123sfsdf

a 1 Times

s 3 Times

d 2 Times

f 3 Times

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You could use the following, provided String s is the string you want to process.

Map<Character,Integer> map = new HashMap<Character,Integer>();
for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
  char c = s.charAt(i);
  if (map.containsKey(c)) {
    int cnt = map.get(c);
    map.put(c, ++cnt);
  } else {
    map.put(c, 1);
  }
}

Note, it will count all of the chars, not only letters.

share|improve this answer
    
@AndrewLogvinov.. Map doesn't have a method contains – Rohit Jain Oct 29 '12 at 10:49
    
@RohitJain Sure, I was writing by memory. Corrected. – Andrew Logvinov Oct 29 '12 at 10:50
    
Was just pointing out. Now its fine :) – Rohit Jain Oct 29 '12 at 10:51
    
I tried to use this solution but I am getting: an item with the same key has already been already. Is this acceptable? – Kala J Jan 27 at 18:27

A better way would be to create a Map to store your count. That would be a Map<Character, Integer>

You need iterate over each character of your string, and check whether its an alphabet. You can use Character#isAlphabetic method for that. If it is an alphabet, increase its count in the Map. If the character is not already in the Map then add it with a count of 1.

NOTE: - Character.isAlphabetic method is new in Java 7. If you are using an older version, you should use Character#isLetter

    String str = "asdfasdfafk asd234asda";
    Map<Character, Integer> charMap = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();
    char[] arr = str.toCharArray();

    for (char value: arr) {

       if (Character.isAlphabetic(value)) {
           if (charMap.containsKey(value)) {
               charMap.put(value, charMap.get(value) + 1);

           } else {
               charMap.put(value, 1);
           }
       }
    }

    System.out.println(charMap);

OUTPUT: -

{f=3, d=4, s=4, a=6, k=1}
share|improve this answer
    
Btw, there is no isAlphabetic() in Character =) At least in java 6. It should be isLetter() perhaps. – Andrew Logvinov Oct 29 '12 at 10:53
    
@AndrewLogvinov. Edited post to quote that. Thanks :) – Rohit Jain Oct 29 '12 at 11:00
    
Didn't know that since I use java 6. Never stop studying =) – Andrew Logvinov Oct 29 '12 at 11:01
    
@AndrewLogvinov. Haha. Yes, indeed, till Java folks have not stopped working :) – Rohit Jain Oct 29 '12 at 11:01

Use google guava Multiset<String>.

Multiset<String> wordsMultiset = HashMultiset.create();
wordsMultiset.addAll(words);
for(Multiset.Entry<E> entry:wordsMultiset.entrySet()){
     System.out.println(entry.getElement()+" - "+entry.getCount());
}
share|improve this answer
 void Findrepeter(){
    String s="mmababctamantlslmag";
    int distinct = 0 ;

    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {

        for (int j = 0; j < s.length(); j++) {

            if(s.charAt(i)==s.charAt(j))
            {
                distinct++;

            }
        }   
        System.out.println(s.charAt(i)+"--"+distinct);
        String d=String.valueOf(s.charAt(i)).trim();
        s=s.replaceAll(d,"");
        distinct = 0;

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Seems rather inefficient, consider using a Map<String, Integer> instead. Also you appear to have a typo in the name of the method – xlm May 11 '14 at 11:25

import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Scanner;

public class HashMapDemo {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    //Create HashMap object to Store Element as Key and Value 
    HashMap<Character,Integer> hm= new HashMap<Character,Integer>();
    //Enter Your String From Console
    System.out.println("Enter an String:");
    //Create Scanner Class Object From Retrive the element from console to our java application
    Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
    //Store Data in an string format
    String s1=sc.nextLine();
    //find the length of an string and check that hashmap object contain the character or not by using 
    //containskey() if that map object contain element only one than count that value as one or if it contain more than one than increment value 

    for(int i=0;i<s1.length();i++){
        if(!hm.containsKey(s1.charAt(i))){
            hm.put(s1.charAt(i),(Integer)1);
        }//if
        else{
            hm.put(s1.charAt(i),hm.get(s1.charAt(i))+1);
        }//else

    }//for

    System.out.println("The Charecters are:"+hm);
}//main

}//HashMapDemo

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