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When the main view of my application is switched (new route that reconnects the main outlet of my application controller) I want the page to be scrolled to the top. Otherwise it's a bit strange that I navigate to another page-like view and the viewport is still lost somewhere where I left off.

I hacked a solution and wonder if there's a better way or if anyone has the same thing.

Here's what I do:

App.ApplicationController = Ember.Controller.extend({
  connectOutlet: function(){
    window.scrollTo(0, 0);
    this._super.apply(this, arguments);
  }
});
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should probably try and extend Ember.Route and add your window.scrollTo in the enter callback. Then instead of using Ember's Route for your leaf routes, you call your route .extend(), so they'll automatically scroll up when you enter a route/state. Something similar to this:

// define your custom route and extend "enter"
var MyRoute = Em.Route.extend({
    enter: function(router) {
        // for now on, all the routes that extend this, 
        // will fire the code in this block every time
        // the application enters this state
        // do whatever you need to do here: scroll and whatnot
    }
});

App.Router = Em.Router.extend({
    enableLogging: true,
    location: 'hash',
    index: Em.Route.extend({
            route: '/',
            connectOutlets: function(router) {
                ...
            },
            // on your leaf routes, use your own custom route that 
            // does your scroll thing or whatever you need to do 
            home: MyRoute.extend({
                route: '/',
                connectOutlets: function (router, context) {
                     ...
                }
            }),
            // other routes...
       })
});

does it make sense?

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Your approach perfectly answers the question. Yes, it seems to be about the leave routes and not about the application controller. –  xMartin Nov 12 '12 at 16:28
    
You could also reopen Ember.Route and check on every "enter" event if this.childStates.length is 0 so you know it's a leave route. Both approaches leave the responsibility to you to call this._super if you need to use the "enter" event in specific routes. –  xMartin Nov 12 '12 at 16:30
    
Just keep in mind that reopening Ember.Route is that you'd be overtiring the enter feature for all routes. You might wanna keep the original functionality in the framework and extend on your own lib. –  MilkyWayJoe Nov 12 '12 at 16:39

I achieved this with the following code:

Ember.Route.reopen({
  render: function(controller, model) {
    this._super();
    window.scrollTo(0, 0);
  }
});
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@Baruch's solution is good, but when I implemented it I had render on elements within my application state and would cause a scrollTop when it was not needed.

I found this to be much more effective as it only runs on the path change:

App.ApplicationController = Ember.Controller.extend({

  currentPathChanged: function () {
    window.scrollTo(0, 0);
  }.observes('currentPath')

});
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I like this approach too, thank you for posting. –  chrishough May 26 at 19:14

@michael-benin seems a good solution but does not work when the url contains a parameter like /post/post_id.

The change of current path uses the name of the route like 'post.index' and does not change in only the parameter 'post_id' changes

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Coffee Script:

Ember.Route.reopen
    activate: ->
      @_super()
      window.scrollTo(0, 0)

Javascript:

Ember.Route.reopen({
  activate: function() {
      this._super();
      window.scrollTo(0, 0);
  }
});
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It's now render(name, options), and if you are specifically calling render (ie with a modal) you want to pass that to super()

Ember.Route.reopen({
  render: function(name, options) {
    if (name != null) {
      return this._super(name, options);
    } else {
      return this._super();
    }
  }
});
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