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I have an object which has some properties and a few of those properties are Lists. Each list contains instances of other classes. What i want to do is take the first item from a list and overwrite those property values.

Here's a pseudo example of what i have:

public class User
{
    public List<Address> Addresses = new List<Address>();

    public User ( )
    {
        Addresses = fill with data;
    }
}


public class TestUser
{
    public User user; // Is filled somewhere in this class

    public void TestUpdateList ( Address addr )
    {
        // The param "addr" contains new values
        // These values must ALWAYS be placed in the first item
        // of the "Addresses" list.

        // Get the first Address object and overwrite that with
        // the new "addr" object
        user.Addresses[0] = addr; // <-- doesn't work, but should give you an idea
    }
}

I hope this example shed some light on what i want to do.

So i am basically looking for a way to "update" an existing item in a list, which is in this case an object.

share|improve this question
1  
What exactly dosn't work? Shouldn't TestUser hold an instance of User inside? – Blachshma Oct 29 '12 at 11:22
    
Why doesn't it work? Can you provide more details on the error? – Richard Oct 29 '12 at 11:23
    
Address is class or struct? – sll Oct 29 '12 at 11:23
    
Well, you can't simply do this: User.Addresses[0] = AddressObjectWithNewValues. In this case User.Addresses` is a List. Each list item has an Address instance and i want to update the first item in that list with another Address object – w00 Oct 29 '12 at 11:28
    
@w00 Also, I'm guessing you meant to write public User user; (lowercase U) – Blachshma Oct 29 '12 at 11:29
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is not entirely clear what you are trying to accomplish, however, see the following code -- there is an Address, a User, and an utility called FeatureX that replaces the first Address of a User with a given value.

class Address {
    public string Street { get; set; }
}

class User {
    public List<Address> Addresses = new List<Address>();
}

class FeatureX {
    public void UpdateUserWithAddress(User user, Address address) {
        if (user.Addresses.Count > 0) {
            user.Addresses[0] = address;
        } else {
            user.Addresses.Add(address);
        }
    }
}

The following usage outputs 'Xyz' two times:

User o = new User();
Address a = new Address() { Street = "Xyz" };

new FeatureX().UpdateUserWithAddress(o, a);
Console.WriteLine(o.Addresses[0].Street);

o = new User();
o.Addresses.Add(new Address { Street = "jjj" });
new FeatureX().UpdateUserWithAddress(o, a);
Console.WriteLine(o.Addresses[0].Street);

Be aware that public fields may cause a lot of trouble if you share your DLL with a third party.

share|improve this answer

Your example doesn't compile because you're accessing the Addresses property via class name. That is only possible if it is static. So you need an instance of a user first, to update his addresses:

User u = new User(userID); // assuming that theres a constructor that takes an identifier
u.Addresses[0] = addr;

C# Language Specification: 10.2.5 Static and instance members

share|improve this answer

I think the problem is that Addresses is a private field.

This works:

[TestFixture]
public class ListTest
{
    [Test]
    public void UpdateTest()
    {
        var user = new User();
        user.Addresses.Add(new Address{Name = "Johan"});
        user.Addresses[0] = new Address { Name = "w00" };
    }
}
public class User
{
    public List<Address> Addresses { get;private  set; }

    public User()
    {
        Addresses= new List<Address>();
    }
}
public class Address
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
public void TestUpdateList ( User user, Address addr )
    {
        // The param "addr" contains new values
        // These values must ALWAYS be placed in the first item
        // of the "Addresses" list.

        // Get the first Address object and overwrite that with
        // the new "addr" object
        user.Addresses[0] = addr; // <-- doesn't work, but should give you an idea
    }
share|improve this answer

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