Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying several ways to decode the bytes of a file into characters.

Using java.io.Reader and Channels.newReader(...)

public static void decodeWithReader() throws Exception {
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(FILE);
    FileChannel channel = fis.getChannel();
    CharsetDecoder decoder = Charset.defaultCharset().newDecoder();
    Reader reader = Channels.newReader(channel, decoder, -1);

    final char[] buffer = new char[4096];
    for(;;) {
        if(-1 == reader.read(buffer)) {
            break;
        }
    }

    fis.close();
}

Using buffers and a decoder manually:

public static void readWithBuffers() throws Exception {
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(FILE);
    FileChannel channel = fis.getChannel();
    CharsetDecoder decoder = Charset.defaultCharset().newDecoder();

    final long fileLength = channel.size();
    long position = 0;
    final int bufferSize = 1024 * 1024;   // 1MB

    CharBuffer cbuf = CharBuffer.allocate(4096);

    while(position < fileLength) {
        MappedByteBuffer bbuf = channel.map(MapMode.READ_ONLY, position, Math.min(bufferSize, fileLength - position));
        for(;;) {
            CoderResult res = decoder.decode(bbuf, cbuf, false);

            if(CoderResult.OVERFLOW == res) {
                cbuf.clear();
            } else if (CoderResult.UNDERFLOW == res) {
                break;
            }
        }
        position += bbuf.position();
    }

    fis.close();
}

For a 200MB text file, the first approach consistently takes 300ms to complete. The second approach consistently takes 700ms. Do you have any idea why the reader approach is so much faster?

Can it run even faster with another implementation?

The benchmark is performed on Windows 7, and JDK7_07.

share|improve this question
1  
The fastest implementation is if you can assume a ISO=8859-1 encoding i.e. avoid using the CharsetDecoder. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Oct 29 '12 at 11:34
2  
You're varying other things at the same time, such as FileInputStream vs MappedByteBuffer. You need to isolate exactly what is faster than what. –  EJP Oct 29 '12 at 11:34

2 Answers 2

For comparison can you try.

public static void readWithBuffersISO_8859_1() throws Exception {
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(FILE);
    FileChannel channel = fis.getChannel();
    MappedByteBuffer bbuf = channel.map(FileChannel.MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, channel.size());
    while(bbuf.remaining()>0) {
        char ch = (char)(bbuf.get() & 0xFF);
    }
    fis.close();
}

This assumes an ISO-8859-1. If you want maximum speed, treating the text like a binary format can help if its an option.

As @EJP points out, you are changing a number of things as once and you need to start with the simplest comparable example and see how much difference each element adds.

share|improve this answer
    
On the example described above, this piece of code runs consistently in 120ms. –  Antoine CHAMBILLE Oct 29 '12 at 12:43
    
I agree with you both that the two examples are not close enough to be compared. I need and will at least get rid of mapped buffers, and then post an update in this topic. –  Antoine CHAMBILLE Oct 29 '12 at 12:45
    
This gives you an idea of the time it takes to scan the data when the file is already in disk cache. The rest of the overhead is in converting the bytes into your preferred character encoding. The reason for suggesting ISO-8859-1 is that the encoding/decoding is trivial –  Peter Lawrey Oct 29 '12 at 12:46
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a third implementation that does not use mapped buffers. In the same conditions than before, it runs consistently in 220ms. The default charset on my machine being "windows-1252", if I force the simpler "ISO-8859-1" charset the decoding is even faster (about 150ms).

It looks like the usage of native features like mapped buffers actually hurts performance (for this very use case). Also interesting, if I allocate direct buffers instead of heap buffers (look at the commented lines) then the performance is reduced (a run then takes around 400ms).

So far the answer seems to be: to decode characters as fast as possible in Java (provided you can't enforce the usage of one charset), use a decoder manually, write the decode loop with heap buffers, do not use mapped buffers or even native ones. I have to admit that I don't really know why it is so.

public static void readWithBuffers() throws Exception {
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(FILE);
    FileChannel channel = fis.getChannel();
    CharsetDecoder decoder = Charset.defaultCharset().newDecoder();

    // CharsetDecoder decoder = Charset.forName("ISO-8859-1").newDecoder();

    ByteBuffer bbuf = ByteBuffer.allocate(4096);
    // ByteBuffer bbuf = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(4096);
    CharBuffer cbuf = CharBuffer.allocate(4096);
    // CharBuffer cbuf = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(2 * 4096).asCharBuffer();

    for(;;) {
        if(-1 == channel.read(bbuf)) {
            decoder.decode(bbuf, cbuf, true);
            decoder.flush(cbuf);
            break;
        }
        bbuf.flip();

        CoderResult res = decoder.decode(bbuf, cbuf, false);
        if(CoderResult.OVERFLOW == res) {
            cbuf.clear();
        } else if (CoderResult.UNDERFLOW == res) {
            bbuf.compact();
        }
    }

    fis.close();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.