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#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
   clrscr();
   FILE *fin;

   fin=fopen("data.txt","r");

   if(fin==NULL)
   {
    printf("can not open input fil");
    return 0;
   }

   long data[2];

   while(!feof(fin))
   {
       fscanf(fin,"%ld %ld",&data[0],&data[1]);
       printf("\n%ld %ld",data[0],data[1]);
   }
   fclose(fin);
   return;
   }

above is my c code for reading a table from a file.In that ..last value is printing 2 times !!!

data.txt
1   34
2   24
3   45
4   56
5   67

but I can not get proper values with broken table like below...How can I resolve it ? (here It should work where it does not find any value it should return "null space" or zero ..but not the next value..)

data.txt
1   34
2   
3   45
4   
5   67

as well as data.txt

1 34
  57
3 45
4   
5 34
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2 Answers 2

above is my c code for reading a table from a file.In that ..last value is printing 2 times !!!

The last value is printing two times due to the structure of the file reading loop. The eof() flag is not set until an attempt is made to read past the end of the file. When fscanf() reads the last two longs from the last line of the file eof() is not yet set but the next call to fscanf() fails and sets eof() but the result of fscanf() is not queried immediately, resulting the use of the previously extracted longs: check the result of all read operations immediately.


A possible solution is to read a line at a time, using fgets(), and then use sscanf() to extract the long value(s) from the read line. If fscanf() is used, it would read past the new-line character to locate the second requested long, which is not the desired behaviour.

For example:

char line[1024];
while (fgets(line, 1024, fin))
{
    /* Assign appropriate default values.
       sscanf() does not modify its arguments
       for which it has no value to assign.
       So if 'line' has a single long value
       data[1] will be zero. */
    long data[2] = { 0, 0 };

    /* You can use 'result' if you require to take particular
       action if it reads only 1, or 0, items. */
    int result = sscanf(line, "%ld %ld", &data[0], &data[1]);

    printf("\n%ld %ld",data[0],data[1]);
}

(in response to question update) To differentiate between lines where second value is missing:

2

and lines where first value is missing:

57

a valid range (or some other criteria) is required to determine which value (the first or second) was missing from the line:

int result = sscanf(line, "%ld %ld", &data[0], &data[1]);
if (1 == result)
{
    if (data[0] >= 1 && data[0] <= 9)
    {
        printf("\n%ld 0", data[0]);
    }
    else
    {
        /* Read value was the second value. */
        printf("\n%ld %ld", ++last_first_value, data[0]);
    }
}

where last_first_value is a long that stores the current value of the first value (either the last successfully read first value or computed from the last successfully read first value).

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the output is something like... 1 34 2 34 3 45 4 45 5 67 and in second case : 1 34 57 34 3 45 4 45 5 67 (odd numers are 1st column and even are second) –  user95711 Oct 29 '12 at 12:11
    
still facing problems where the "FIRST" value is missing...It is taking the second one as a FIRST..and gives 0 to second one... and as it is just example table... In real one the data is about 5-7000 lines,may be the column number also increase. –  user95711 Oct 29 '12 at 13:03
    
That code update (for checking first value missing) is wrong. sscanf will skip past any whitespace. You need to check characters on the line itself: if (line[0] >= '1' && line[0] <= '9'). A better way would be to check if (!isspace(line[0])). I would have also put the correct numbers back into the data array if I was going to use them for anything. –  paddy Oct 29 '12 at 13:10
    
@paddy, there is no leading whitespace if the second value is present. The check for first character being a space helps in no way at all. –  hmjd Oct 29 '12 at 13:26
    
The example broken file contains leading whitespace when the first value is missing. I don't see where it has been said otherwise. –  paddy Oct 29 '12 at 13:30
show 5 more comments
while(!feof(fin))
{
   fscanf(fin,"%ld %ld",&data[0],&data[1]);
   printf("\n%ld %ld",data[0],data[1]);
}

feof doesn't return true until after you attempt to read past the end of the file, so the loop will execute once too often. It's better to check the return value of fscanf and if it doesn't match what you expect (2 in this case), then check for EOF. Here's one possible restructuring:

int good = 1;
while (good)
{
  int itemsRead = fscanf(fin, "%ld %ld", &data[0], &data[1]);
  if (itemsRead == 2)
  {
    // process data[0] and data[1] normally
  }
  else 
  {
    good = !good;
    if (feof(fin))
      printf("Hit end of file\n");
    else if (ferror(fin))
      printf("Error during read\n");
    else
      printf("Malformed input line\n");
  }
}
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