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I have a script that adds full images dynamically over thumbnails when you hover over them. I've also given the full images a CSS :hover style to make them expand to a larger width (where normally they are constrained to the dimensions of the thumbnail). This works fine if the image loads quickly or is cached, but if the full image takes a long time to load and you don't move the mouse while it's loading, then once it does appear it will usually stay at the thumbnail width (the non-:hover style) until you move the mouse again. I get this behavior in all browsers that I've tried it in. I'm wondering if this is a bug, and if there's a way to fix or work around it.

It may be worth noting that I've also tried to do the same thing in Javascript with .on('mouseenter'), and encountered the same problem.

Due to the nature of the issue, it can be hard to reproduce, especially if you have a fast connection. I chose a largish photo from Wikipedia to demonstrate, but to make it work you might have to change it to something especially large or from a slow domain. Also note that you may have to clear the cache for successive retries.

If you still can't reproduce, you can add an artificial delay to the fullimage.load before the call to anchor.show().

HTML:

<img id="image" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/32/Cairo_International_Stadium.jpg/220px-Cairo_International_Stadium.jpg" />

CSS:

.kiyuras-image {
    position: absolute;
    top: 8px;
    left: 8px;
    max-width: 220px;
}

.kiyuras-image:hover {
    max-width: 400px;
}

JS:

$(function () {

    var fullimageurl = 'http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Cairo_International_Stadium.jpg';

    var fullimage = $('<img/>')
        .addClass('kiyuras-image')
        .load(function () {
            anchor.show();
        });

    var anchor = $('<a/>').hide().append(fullimage);

    $('body').prepend(anchor);

    $("#image").on('mouseenter', function () {
        fullimage.attr('src',fullimageurl);
        $(this).off('mouseenter');
    });

});

JS Bin

Updated JS Bin with 1.5-second delay added (Hopefully makes issue clearer)

Again: Reproducing the issue involves clearing your cache of the large image, and then hovering over the original image to initial the loading of large image, then not moving your mouse while it's loading. Intended behavior is for the large image to properly take on the :hover pseudo-class when it eventually loads. Issue I see when it takes longer than ~0.75 secs to load is that it does not take on :hover until you jiggle the mouse a little.

Edit: See my comments on @LucaFagioli's answer for further details of my use case.

Edit, the sequel: I thought I already did this, but I just tried to reproduce the issue in Firefox and I couldn't. Perhaps this is a Chrome bug?

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4  
Just a side-note: instead of using .on() and then unbinding again with .off() you can use .one() instead. see api.jquery.com/one –  xec Oct 29 '12 at 11:37
    
@xec, Cool, thanks for the tip! –  jrajav Oct 29 '12 at 11:42
    
set up a jsfiddle and people will see your issue more clearly –  Mild Fuzz Oct 29 '12 at 12:47
    
@MildFuzz, There is a JS Bin link at the end. Sorry, I know it could be more noticeable. –  jrajav Oct 29 '12 at 12:50
    
just fyi, that .delay(1000) isn't delaying anything, as it only delays animations. .delay(1000).show(0) would do the trick –  antishok Nov 3 '12 at 17:21
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9 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+100

Most browsers update their hover states only when the cursor moves over an element by at least one pixel. When the cursor enters the thumbnail's img it gets hover applied and runs your mouseenter handler. If you keep your cursor still until the full-sized image loads, your old img (the thumbnail) will keep the hover state and the new one won't get it.

To get it working in these browsers, move the hover pseudo-class to a common parent element in the CSS; for example, enclose both imgs in a span.

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After thinking about it some more, it wasn't very fair of me to accept my own answer - this is the important part of the solution, and my freaking huge explanation doesn't add much. Basically, the way browsers work, this is the reliable way to do this effect. If you want to know why this might be the case, see my answer below. –  jrajav Nov 7 '12 at 11:31
    
This is a really neat solution, BTW. Nicer than mine, so I've updated my answer to point to this one. –  Jordan Gray Nov 7 '12 at 13:13
    
This solution does not allow any animation. It is unthinkable to use it nowadays in a professional environment. See my answer. –  Luca Fagioli Nov 7 '12 at 18:45
    
No I am not. CSS3 transition property is not supported by any version of IE. You can verify it with the same link. –  Luca Fagioli Nov 9 '12 at 13:22
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If the selectors are correct, CSS will be applied to all elements, dynamic or otherwise. This includes all pseudo classes, and will change as attributes in the DOM change.

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2  
what is "pointers"? –  xec Oct 29 '12 at 11:28
1  
They certainly should be, I agree. However, that's not what I'm seeing, as I tried to explain in detail. Were you able to reproduce my issue? –  jrajav Oct 29 '12 at 11:29
1  
You mean selectors right? –  Pranav 웃 Oct 29 '12 at 11:31
1  
fixed for the pedants ;) –  Mild Fuzz Oct 29 '12 at 11:32
1  
They're only words, dude. Only words. ;) –  Mild Fuzz Oct 29 '12 at 11:40
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[Edit: while my explanation might be of interest, pozs' solution above is nicer, so I suggest using that if you can.]

The hover pseudo-class specification is quite relaxed concerning when it should be activated:

CSS does not define which elements may be in the above states, or how the states are entered and left. Scripting may change whether elements react to user events or not, and different devices and UAs may have different ways of pointing to, or activating elements.

In particular, it is not being activated when you update the visibility of the anchor element on load.

You can get around this fairly easily: copy the hover styles to a class, intercept the cursor moving over the element that it will eventually cover, and based on that add or remove your class from the element.

Demo: JS Bin (based on your delayed example).

Javascript:

$("#image")
  .on('mouseenter', function () {
    fullimage.attr('src',fullimageurl).toggleClass('mouseover', true);
    $(this).off('mouseenter');
  })
  .mouseleave(function() {
    fullimage.toggleClass('mouseover', false);
  });

CSS:

.kiyuras-image:hover, .kiyuras-image.mouseover {
    max-width: 400px;
}
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TL;DR: You cannot rely on :hover applying to dynamically added elements underneath the cursor. However, there are workarounds available in both pure CSS and Javascript.

I'm upvoting both Jordan Gray and posz' answers, and I wish I could award them both the bounty. Jordan Gray addressed the issue re: the CSS specification in a somewhat conclusive way and offered (another) working fix that still allowed for :hover and other CSS effects like transitions, except on load. posz provided a solution that works even better and avoids Javascript for any of the hover events; I provide essentially the same solution here, but with a div instead of a span. I decided to award it to him, but I think Jordan's input was essential. I'm adding and accepting my own answer because I felt the need to elaborate more on all of this myself. (Edit: Changed, I accepted posz')

Jordan referenced the CSS2 spec; I will refer instead to CSS3. As far as I can tell, they don't differ on this point.

The pseudo-class in question is :hover, which refers to elements that the user has "designated with a pointing device." The exact definition of the behavior is deliberately left vague to allow for different kinds of interaction and media, which unfortunately means that the spec does not address questions like: "Should a new element that appears under the pointing device have this pseudo-class applied?" This is a hard question to answer. Which answer will align with user intent in a majority of cases? A dynamic change to a page the user is interacting with would normally be a result of ongoing user interaction or preparation for the same. Therefore, I would say yes, and most current browsers seem to agree. Normally, when you add an element under the cursor, :hover is immediately applied. You can see this here: The jsbin I originally posted. Note that if there's a delay in loading the larger image, you may have to refresh the page to get it to work, for reasons I'll go into.

Now, there's a similar case where the user activates the browser itself with the cursor held stationary over an element with a :hover rule; should it apply in that case? The mouse "hover" in this case was not a result of direct user interaction. But the pointing device is designating it, right? Besides, any movement of the mouse will certainly result in an unambiguous interaction. This is a harder question to answer, and browsers answer it in different ways. When you're activating them, Chrome and Firefox do not change :hover state until you move the mouse (Even if you activated them with a click!). Internet Explorer, on the other hand, updates :hover state as soon as it's activated. In fact, it updates it even when it's not active, as long as it's the first visible window under the mouse. You can see this yourself using the jsbin linked above.

Let's return to the first case, though, because that's where my current issue arises. In my case, the user hasn't moved the mouse for a significant length of time (over a second), and an element is added directly underneath the cursor. This could more easily be argued to be a case where user interaction is ambiguous, and where the pseudo-class should not be toggled. Personally, I think that it should still be applied. However, most browsers do not seem to agree with me. When you hover over the image for the first time and then do not move your mouse in this jsbin (Which is the one I posted in my question to demonstrate the issue, and, like the first one, has a straightforward :hover selector), the :hover class is not applied in current Chrome, Opera, and IE. (Safari also doesn't apply it, but interestingly, it does if you go on to press a key on the keyboard.) In Firefox, however, the :hover class is applied immediately. Since Chrome and Firefox were the only two I initially tested with, I thought this was a bug in Chrome. However, the spec is more or less completely silent on this point. Most implementations say nay; Firefox and I say aye.

Here are the relevant sections of the spec:

The :hover pseudo-class applies while the user designates an element with a pointing device, but does not necessarily activate it. For example, a visual user agent could apply this pseudo-class when the cursor (mouse pointer) hovers over a box generated by the element. User agents not that do not support interactive media do not have to support this pseudo-class. Some conforming user agents that support interactive media may not be able to support this pseudo-class (e.g., a pen device that does not detect hovering).

[...]

Selectors doesn't define if the parent of an element that is ‘:active’ or ‘:hover’ is also in that state.

[...]

Note: If the ‘:hover’ state applies to an element because its child is designated by a pointing device, then it's possible for ‘:hover’ to apply to an element that is not underneath the pointing device.

So! On to the workarounds! As several have zealously pointed out in this thread, Javascript and jQuery provide solutions for this as well, relying on the 'mouseover' and 'mouseenter' DOM events. I explored quite a few of those solutions myself, both before and after asking this question. However, these have their own issues, they have slightly different behavior, and they usually involve simply toggling a CSS class anyway. Besides, why use Javascript if it's not necessary?

I was interested in finding a solution that used :hover and nothing else, and this is it (jsbin). Instead of putting the :hover on the element being added, we instead put it on an existing element that contains that new element, and that takes up the same physical space; in this case, a div containing both the thumbnail and the new larger image (which, when not hovered, will be the same size as the div and thumbnail). This would seem to be fairly specific to my use case, but it could probably be accomplished in general using a positioned div with the same size as the new element.

Adding: After I finished composing this answer, pozs provided basically the same solution as above!

A compromise between this and one of the full-Javascript solutions is to have a one-time-use class that will effectively rely on Javascript/DOM hover events while adding the new element, and then remove all that and rely on :hover going forward. This is the solution Jordan Gray offered (Jsbin)

Both of these work in all the browsers I tried: Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, and Internet Explorer.

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From this part of your question: "This works fine if the image loads quickly or is cached, but if the full image takes a long time to load and you don't move the mouse while it's loading,"

Could it be worth while to "preload" all of the images first with JavaScript. This may allow all of the images to load successfully first, and it may be a little more user friendly for people with slower connections.

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1  
Yes, and I thought of that, but this script is intended to be used on pages with potentially many of these images, and even though that loading would be done asynchronously, it may be an unwelcome drain on bandwidth to load several megabytes worth of images that may not be used. –  jrajav Oct 29 '12 at 11:44
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You could do something like that : http://jsfiddle.net/jR5Ba/5/

In summary, append a loading layout in front of your image, then append a div containing your large image with a .load() callback to remove your loading layer.

The fiddle above has not been simplified and cleaned up due to lack of time, but I can continue to work on it tomorrow if needed.

$imageContainer = $("#image-container");    
$image = $('#image');

$imageContainer.on({
    mouseenter: function (event) {    
       //Add a loading class
       $imageContainer.addClass('loading');
       $image.css('opacity',0.5); 

       //Insert div (for styling) containing large image            
       $(this).append('<div><img class="hidden large-image-container" id="'+this.id+'-large" src="'+fullimageurl+'" /></div>');

       //Append large image load callback            
       $('#'+this.id+'-large').load(function() {
           $imageContainer.removeClass('loading');
           $image.css('opacity',1);
           $(this).slideDown('slow');
           //alert ("The image has loaded!");        
       });
    },            
    mouseleave: function (event) {
       //Remove loading class
       $imageContainer.removeClass('loading');
       //Remove div with large image 
       $('#'+this.id+'-large').remove();
       $image.css('opacity',1);             
    }        
});

EDIT

Here is a new version of the fiddle including the right size loading layer with an animation when the large picture is displayed : http://jsfiddle.net/jR5Ba/6/

Hope it will help

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This answer also doesn't directly address my issue. In fact, it doesn't do anything with a :hover or even a .on('mouseenter') with the image itself. In addition, your solution results in the large image visibly loading at the "large" size, which is not ideal. It also hides the issue, because my issue involves firing the :hover or .on('mouseenter') once the image has finished loading to resize it to the large size; with yours, that is not needed because it's already at that size. –  jrajav Oct 31 '12 at 22:50
    
You are right, it was not an amazing fiddle. I updated my answer with another one, I hope that will help you to find a solution about your problem –  sdespont Nov 1 '12 at 6:31
    
Well, that one's not quite ideal either, because it results in an animation that starts from size 0 rather than the size of the original image. Also, the loading animation is queued even if the large image is already loaded. Those are minor details, though; the real question is how did you solve my main issue, and the answer seems to be that you completely add and remove the large image every time, relying instead on the mouseenter of the original thumbnail. I would prefer not going that route for performance and visual consistency, but it's worth a try. In the end, it's still a workaround. –  jrajav Nov 1 '12 at 10:53
    
The large image animation is not an issue, a lot of possibilities exist using JQuery and many more using UI extension (jqueryui.com/effect) or simply no animation. I am sure that CSS :hover cannot be used to know if the image is completely loaded, it is why I use the trick to create a dynamic div to display it. With this new div, it is possible to add loading behaviour to make the large image loading understandable by the user. I don't have any other idea if you don't like this one, else I can help you to adapt your needs –  sdespont Nov 1 '12 at 17:37
1  
I take time to think and write this answer, please take also time to comment your downvote! –  sdespont Nov 6 '12 at 16:36
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Don't let the IMG tag get added to the DOM until it has an image to download. That way the Load event won't fire until the image has been loaded. Here is the amended JS:

$(function () {

    var fullimageurl = 'http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Cairo_International_Stadium.jpg';

    var fullimage = $('<img/>')
        .addClass('kiyuras-image')
        .load(function () {
            anchor.show(); // Only happens after IMG src has loaded
        });

    var anchor = $('<a/>').hide();

    $('body').prepend(anchor);

    $("#image").on('mouseenter', function () {
        fullimage.attr('src',fullimageurl); // IMG has source
        $(this).off('mouseenter');
        anchor.append(fullimage); // Append IMG to DOM now.
    });

});
share|improve this answer
    
I still see the issue with this JS. Also, if I'm not mistaken, won't the image not even start to be retrieved until it has a src attribute and it's been added to the DOM? By the way, I might have asked an unanswerable question - this may be a browser bug. Sorry! I'll find out soon enough. If it is, I will post a self-answer. –  jrajav Nov 3 '12 at 15:04
    
Correct, the image won't start to be retrieved until after the IMG tag has a src attribute. However, your original code added the IMG tag to the DOM before it had a src. Because of that, it was firing its load event before the image was retrieved. By reordering the sequence of instructions, the load event (and thus, the statement where you show() the anchor) happens after the image has been retrieved . This works perfectly in my copy of Chrome. –  joequincy Nov 3 '12 at 16:25
    
Can you define "works perfectly?" You're saying that you can reproduce my issue with the original jsbin I posted - that is, the first mouseover after loading the page, followed by not moving the mouse and waiting about 2 seconds, results in the :hover not applying and the larger image remaining at the thumbnail width - but the same reproduction steps with your JS substituted (version 12/ of the jsbin) results in the :hover applying? Because that's not what I'm seeing. –  jrajav Nov 3 '12 at 16:47
    
Well, with the exception that the image you're using loads almost instantly, so in order to reproduce the lag effect you mentioned in your question more naturally, I use a larger image. The image appears at the smaller size in your JSBin (although it does correct itself to the 400px width about a second after it has been shown). In my edit however, when the image has been downloaded, it appears and instantly jumps to the 400px size. I am using Chrome, with no extensions. –  joequincy Nov 3 '12 at 17:43
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I did that and it worked on Chrome (version 22.0.1229.94 m): I changed the css as that:

.kiyuras-image{
    position: absolute;
    top: 8px;
    left: 8px;
    max-width: 400px;
}
.not-hovered{
    max-width: 220px;
}

and the script this way:

$(function(){
    var fullimageurl = 'http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Cairo_International_Stadium.jpg';

    var fullimage = $('<img/>')
        .addClass('kiyuras-image')
        .load(function () {
            anchor.show();
        });

    var anchor = $('<a/>').hide().append(fullimage);

    $('body').prepend(anchor);

    $('.kiyuras-image').on('mouseout',function(){
        $(this).addClass('not-hovered');
    });
    $('.kiyuras-image').on('mouseover',function(){
        $(this).removeClass('not-hovered');
    });

    $("#image").one('mouseover', function(){
        fullimage.attr('src',fullimageurl);
    });
});

Basically I think it's a Chrome bug in detecting/rendering the 'hover' status; in fact when I tried to simply change the css as:

.kiyuras-image{
    position: absolute;
    top: 8px;
    left: 8px;
    max-width: 400px;
}
.kiyuras-image:not(:hover) {
    position: absolute;
    top: 8px;
    left: 8px;
    max-width: 220px;
}

it still didn't worked.

PS: sorry for my english.

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I'm not 100% sure why the :hover declaration is only triggered on slight mouse move. A possible reason could be that technically you may not really hover the element. Basically you're shoving the element under the cursor while it is loading (until the large image is completely loaded the A element has display: none and can therefore impossible be in the :hover state). At the same time, that doesn't explain the difference with smaller images though...

So, a workaround is to just use JavaScript and leave the :hover statement out of the equation. Just show the user the two different IMG elements depending on the hover state (toggles in JavaScript). As an extra advantage, the image doesn't have to be scaled up and down dynamically by the browser (visual glitch in Chrome).

See http://jsbin.com/ifitep/34/

UPDATE: By using JavaScript to add an .active class on the large image, it's entirely possible to keep using native CSS animations. See http://jsbin.com/ifitep/48

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Good insight, but going this route doesn't allow it to be animated. However, you're right that toggling between the two images is better than scaling the larger image if it wasn't to be animated. Thanks for your answer! –  jrajav Nov 5 '12 at 19:43
    
It does actually, by using JavaScript to add classes, getting around the need to use :hover. See jsbin.com/ifitep/48 or jsbin.com/ifitep/49 which adds scaling effect (the sky is the limit!). –  hongaar Nov 6 '12 at 17:23
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