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I'm trying to work out an efficient way of comparing two rows in SQL Server 2008. I need to write a query which finds all rows in the Movement table which have Speed < 10 N consecutive times.

The structure of the table is:

EventTime Speed

If the data were:

2012-02-05 13:56:36.980, 2
2012-02-05 13:57:36.980, 11
2012-02-05 13:57:46.980, 2
2012-02-05 13:59:36.980, 2
2012-02-05 14:06:36.980, 22
2012-02-05 15:56:36.980, 2

Then it would return rows 3/4 (13:57:46.980 / 13:59:36.980) if I looked for 2 consecutive rows, and would return nothing if I looked for three consecutive rows. The order of the data is EventTime/DateTime only.

Any help you could give me would be great. I'm considering using cursors but they're usually pretty inefficient. Also, this table is approximately 10m rows in size, so the more efficient the better! :)

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Are these data grouped together by some other field? Such as thingy_id, or are these two columns really the only two columns? –  MatBailie Oct 29 '12 at 12:04
    
@Dems - There are other columns which will help limit the result set down to 10k/100k rows - But the solution I'm looking for can't be grouped any further down than the basic example listed above. There is nothing which will help any more, it's literately finding the next/previous row based on EventTime and the Speed fields. –  Vijay Oct 29 '12 at 12:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
DECLARE
  @n             INT,
  @speed_limit   INT
SELECT
  @n             = 5,
  @speed_limit   = 10

;WITH
  partitioned AS
(
  SELECT
    *,
    CASE WHEN speed < @speed_limit THEN 1 ELSE 0 END   AS PartitionID
  FROM
    Movement
)
,
  sequenced AS
(
  SELECT
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (                         ORDER BY EventTime) AS MasterSeqID,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY PartitionID ORDER BY EventTime) AS PartIDSeqID,
    *
  FROM
    partitioned
)
,
  filter AS
(
  SELECT
    MasterSeqID - PartIDSeqID    AS GroupID,
    MIN(MasterSeqID)             AS GroupFirstMastSeqID,
    MAX(MasterSeqID)             AS GroupFinalMastSeqID
  FROM
    sequenced
  WHERE
    PartitionID = 1
  GROUP BY
    MasterSeqID - PartIDSeqID
  HAVING
    COUNT(*) >= @n
)
SELECT
  sequenced.*
FROM
  filter
INNER JOIN
  sequenced
    ON  sequenced.MasterSeqID >= filter.GroupFirstMastSeqID
    AND sequenced.MasterSeqID <= filter.GroupFinalMastSeqID

Alternative final steps (inspired by @t-clausen-dk), to avoid an additional JOIN. I would test both to see which is more performant.

,
  filter AS
(
  SELECT
    MasterSeqID - PartIDSeqID                              AS GroupID,
    COUNT(*) OVER (PARTITION BY MasterSeqID - PartIDSeqID) AS GroupSize,
    *
  FROM
    sequenced
  WHERE
    PartitionID = 1
)
SELECT
  *
FROM
  filter
WHERE
  GroupSize >= @n
share|improve this answer
    
Is it possible to get the time between the first/last record in the sequence? So if my @n = 2 then it either returns the first&last row or returns the first row with the total time until the last row? –  Vijay Oct 29 '12 at 13:05
    
@vijay - Yes, you have many options here. In the last step just group by the GroupID field that I create in the filter step, and then use MIN(EventTime) and MAX(EventTime). Or, just add the MIN() and MAX() calculations to the filter step itself. –  MatBailie Oct 29 '12 at 13:14
    
@Dems I think you have a very good idea with the new code. But there is some references to columns that are not there (in sequenced) –  t-clausen.dk Oct 29 '12 at 13:27
    
@Dems - Your solution appears, when @n=2 to return the first row, but only group a maximum of two rows. So if there are 10 sequential rows which meet the criteria it will return 5 matches, is it possible to make @n a minimum match? So in that scenario it will return one row? –  Vijay Oct 29 '12 at 13:28
    
@Dems - Nevermind :) –  Vijay Oct 29 '12 at 13:50
declare @t table(EventTime datetime, Speed int)
insert @t values('2012-02-05 13:56:36.980', 2)
insert @t values('2012-02-05 13:57:36.980', 11)
insert @t values('2012-02-05 13:57:46.980', 2)
insert @t values('2012-02-05 13:59:36.980', 2)
insert @t values('2012-02-05 14:06:36.980', 22)
insert @t values('2012-02-05 15:56:36.980', 2)

declare @N int = 1

;with a as
(
  select EventTime, Speed, row_number() over (order by EventTime) rn from @t
), b as
(
  select EventTime, Speed, 1 grp,  rn from a where rn = 1
  union all
  select a.EventTime, a.Speed, case when a.speed < 10 and b.speed < 10 then grp else grp + 1 end, a.rn
  from a join b on a.rn = b.rn+1
), c as
(
  select EventTime, Speed, count(*) over (partition by grp) cnt from b
)
select * from c
where cnt > @N
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0) -- Thx Dems
share|improve this answer
    
+1 : Although, for 10m records, you may want to specify OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0) :) –  MatBailie Oct 29 '12 at 12:37
    
@Dems - You +1d this solution, which solution do you prefer? –  Vijay Oct 29 '12 at 12:38
    
@Vijay - I like the COUNT(*) OVER (PARTITION BY grp) more than my filter step. But I dislike the recursive step used here, due to the huge volume of data and highly sequential nature of the recursive step. –  MatBailie Oct 29 '12 at 12:42
    
@Vijay both solutions are valid, I suggest you test them both and compare performance. –  t-clausen.dk Oct 29 '12 at 12:43

Almost the same ideea as Dems, a little bit different:

select * from (
 select eventtime, speed, rnk, new_rnk, 
      rnk - new_rnk,
      max(rnk) over (partition by speed, new_rnk-rnk) -
      min(rnk) over (partition by speed, new_rnk-rnk) + 1  as no_consec
  from (
     select eventtime, rnk, speed,
            row_number() over (partition by speed order by eventtime) as new_rnk
     from (
             select eventtime, speed,
             row_number() over (order by eventtime) as rnk
             from a 
          ) a
     where a.speed < 5
  )
order by eventtime
  )
where no_consec >= 2;

5 is speed limit and 2 is min number of consecutive events. I put date as number for simplicity of writing the create database.

SQLFIDDLE

EDIT:

To answer to comments, I've added three columns in the first inner query. To get only the first row you need to add an pos_in_group = 1 to WHERE clause and the distance is at your fingers.

SQLFIDDLE

select eventtime, speed, min_date, max_date, pos_in_group

from (
  select eventtime, speed, rnk, new_rnk, 
      rnk - new_rnk,
      row_number() over (partition by speed, new_rnk-rnk order by eventtime) pos_in_group,
      min(eventtime) over (partition by speed, new_rnk-rnk) min_date,
      max(eventtime) over (partition by speed, new_rnk-rnk) max_date,
      max(rnk) over (partition by speed, new_rnk-rnk) -
      min(rnk) over (partition by speed, new_rnk-rnk) + 1  as no_consec
  from (
     select eventtime, rnk, speed,
            row_number() over (partition by speed order by eventtime) as new_rnk
     from (
             select eventtime, speed,
             row_number() over (order by eventtime) as rnk
             from a 
          ) a
     where a.speed < 5
     )
  order by eventtime
  )
where no_consec > 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Is it possible to only return the first row in the sequence, so if no_consec >= 2 then it returns on the first row where this is true and the difference in EventTime between the first and last rows? –  Vijay Oct 29 '12 at 13:35

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