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See the inheritance example from the playground on the TypeScript site:

class Animal {
    public name;
    constructor(name) { 
        this.name = name;
    }
    move(meters) {
        alert(this.name + " moved " + meters + "m.");
    }
}

class Snake extends Animal {
    constructor(name) { super(name); }
    move() {
        alert("Slithering...");
        super.move(5);
    }
}

class Horse extends Animal {
    constructor( name) { super(name); }
    move() {
        alert(super.name + " is Galloping...");
        super.move(45);
    }
}

var sam = new Snake("Sammy the Python")
var tom: Animal = new Horse("Tommy the Palomino")

sam.move()
tom.move(34)

I have change one line of code: the alert in Horse.move(). There I want to access "super.name", but that returns just undefined. Intellisense is suggesting that I can use it and TypeScript compiles fine. But it does not work. Any ideas?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Working example. Notes below.

class Animal {
    constructor(public name) {
    }

    move(meters) {
        alert(this.name + " moved " + meters + "m.");
    }
}

class Snake extends Animal {
    move() {
        alert(this.name + " is Slithering...");
        super.move(5);
    }
}

class Horse extends Animal {
    move() {
        alert(this.name + " is Galloping...");
        super.move(45);
    }
}

var sam = new Snake("Sammy the Python");
var tom: Animal = new Horse("Tommy the Palomino");

sam.move();
tom.move(34);
  1. You don't need to manually assign the name to a public variable. Using public name in the constructor definition does this for you.

  2. You don't need to call super(name) from the specialised classes.

  3. Using this.name works.

Notes on use of super.

This is covered in more detail in section 4.8.2 of the language specification.

The behaviour of the classes inheriting from Animal is not dissimilar to the behaviour in other languages. You need to specify the super keyword in order to avoid confusion between a specialised function and the base class function. For example, if you called move() or this.move() you would be dealing with the specialised Snake or Horse function, so using super.move() explicitly calls the base class function.

There is no confusion of properties, as they are the properties of the instance. There is no difference between super.name and this.name - there is simply this.name. Otherwise you could create a Horse that had different names depending on whether you were in the specialized class or the base class.

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Great answer, and thanks for the reference to the language specification. Are you aware of any documentation on why, for example, base class property accessors aren't virtualized and accessible via overriding accessors in the derived class (as methods are)? –  David Cuccia Jan 11 at 20:41
    
Section 4.8 covers everything that has been written down to date - it tends to be a "this is the behaviour", though rather than a "this is why". –  Steve Fenton Jan 11 at 20:46
1  
Thanks Steve Fenton. I also just stumbled upon a similar discussion here: typescript.codeplex.com/discussions/418349. Seems to be an imbalance in the language; my guess is the decision was made to keep the emitted JavaScript simple, as opposed to "work-around" helper methods to compensate for the lack of JavaScript support. –  David Cuccia Jan 11 at 20:52

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