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What would be the best way to parse this XML texture atlas file, with ios/obj-c.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-16"?>
<TextureAtlas imagePath="Atlas@4x.png">
    <!-- Created with Adobe Flash CS6 version 11.0.4.452 -->
    <!-- http://www.adobe.com/products/flash.html -->
    <SubTexture name="ArmyIcon instance 10000" x="0" y="0" width="202" height="207"/>
    <SubTexture name="foodIcon instance 10000" x="202" y="0" width="201" height="207"/>
    <SubTexture name="gemsIcon instance 10000" x="403" y="0" width="202" height="206"/>
    <SubTexture name="goldIcon instance 10000" x="605" y="0" width="201" height="206"/>
    <SubTexture name="lightningIcon instance 10000" x="806" y="0" width="202" height="241"/>
    <SubTexture name="logsIcon instance 10000" x="0" y="241" width="198" height="170"/>
    <SubTexture name="marketButton0000" x="198" y="241" width="263" height="245"/>
    <SubTexture name="populationIcon instance 10000" x="461" y="241" width="201" height="207"/>
    <SubTexture name="rocksIcon instance 10000" x="662" y="241" width="201" height="207"/>
    <SubTexture name="statusIcon instance 10000" x="0" y="486" width="276" height="206"/>
    <SubTexture name="storageIcon instance 10000" x="276" y="486" width="202" height="207"/>
    <SubTexture name="t00010000" x="478" y="486" width="340" height="306"/>
    <SubTexture name="t00020000" x="0" y="792" width="340" height="306"/>
    <SubTexture name="waterIcon instance 10000" x="340" y="792" width="201" height="206"/>
</TextureAtlas>

I want to get to the subTexture parts of it, and have those strings saved in an array, or if possible I guess just be able to index this XML file like you would an array, any ideas?

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What 2D framework are you using? Sparrow, for instance, has support for this file-structure built-in. –  Richard J. Ross III Oct 29 '12 at 12:43
    
I'm using Sparrow, what do you mean by support? obviously I know I can create a new texture using the sparrow image methods, but I need to be able to access that XML file and read the actual strings, get the names that the file contains. –  Phil Oct 29 '12 at 12:51
    
Look into the SPTextureAtlas class - that should get you started. IIRC, you can just pass it a link to the atlas file, and you should be golden! –  Richard J. Ross III Oct 29 '12 at 12:51
    
I like that XML-NSDictionary below, but I think I'm going to try to change SPTextureAtlas to store all of the subTexture strings somehow in a big array for future reference. –  Phil Oct 29 '12 at 14:30

1 Answer 1

It is quite easy if you use NSXMLParsers APIs. Have a look at this tutorial:

http://wiki.cs.unh.edu/wiki/index.php/Parsing_XML_data_with_NSXMLParser

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't recommend NSXMLParser, at all. True, it's built-in, but it's old, slow, and it's a SAX parser (which can be quite confusing, especially to a newcomer). I would suggest the more complex, but more powerful, libxml2, and use the DOM tree there, or if you dare, the C-function based SAX callbacks. –  Richard J. Ross III Oct 29 '12 at 12:44
    
Thats true, but it depends if he wants to program in Objective-C or C. –  Evol Gate Oct 29 '12 at 12:48
    
Objective-C and C are one and the same, objective-c at it's core is just a compatibility framework for C, with some extra syntax. Taking the time to learn how to use a semi-decent (and cross platform) XML parser like libxml2 is quite a useful skill to have, and the performance you gain is not trivial. –  Richard J. Ross III Oct 29 '12 at 12:50
    
And a quick note - if you are going to use libxml2, I strongly suggest using it's XPath DOM parser, along with it. –  Richard J. Ross III Oct 29 '12 at 12:51
    
It's fine as well - the only thing to consider is that it's a third party library, who's licenses may or may not be applicable to the application you are developing, and it's definitely not cross platform. As long as you keep that in mind, you should be fine. –  Richard J. Ross III Oct 29 '12 at 12:56

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