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So, I have got the following classes and methods:

Property: Has a single member of type int (named mTag)

TypedProperty: Inherits from the Property class and adds a member called mValue of type T to it.

PropertyList: A class which Maintains a std::set of Property and has an Add and Print method.

CheckSubset: A method which checks if a std::set is included in another set.

I don't know how I should implement the CheckSubset method. Because I do not know how to iterate through a set<Property> and access to the template member (mValue). I also tried to use the includes method, which did not work (even if it worked, I would have no idea how it did!). The same problem exists in the PropertyList::Print method, where I do not know what cast should be used.
Any advice on the implementation of CheckSubset and Print methods would be appreciated!

Updated source code (using pointer)

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <algorithm>
#include <tr1/memory>

using namespace std;

/////////////////// Property Class //////////////////////

class Property
{
public:
    Property(){};
    Property(const int tag)
            : mTag(tag) {}
    virtual ~Property() {}
    int mTag;
    bool operator<(const Property &property) const
    {
        return mTag < property.mTag;
    }
};

/////////////////// TypedProperty Class /////////////////

template< typename T >
class TypedProperty : public Property
{
public:
    TypedProperty (const int tag, const T& value)
            : Property(tag), mValue(value){}
    T mValue;
};

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

typedef std::tr1::shared_ptr<Property> PropertyPtr;

/////////////////// PropertyList Class /////////////////

class PropertyList
{
public:
    PropertyList(){};
    virtual ~PropertyList(){};
    template <class T>
    void Add(int tag, T value) 
    {
    PropertyPtr ptr(new TypedProperty<T>(tag, value));
        mProperties.insert(ptr);
    }
    void Print()
    {
    for(set<PropertyPtr>::iterator itr = mProperties.begin(); itr != mProperties.end(); itr++)
    {
        cout << ((PropertyPtr)*itr)->mTag << endl; 
        // What should I do to print mValue? I do not know its type
        // what should *itr be cast to? 
    }
    }
    set<PropertyPtr> mProperties;
};

//////////////////// Check Subset ///////////////////////
/*
 * Checks if subset is included in superset 
 */
bool CheckSubset(set<PropertyPtr> &superset, set<PropertyPtr> &subset)
{
    // How can I iterate over superset and subset values while I do not know
    // the type of mValue inside each Property?
    // I also tried the following method which does not seem to work correctly
    return includes(superset.begin(), superset.end(), 
            subset.begin(), subset.end());
}

int main()
{
    PropertyList properties1;
    properties1.Add(1, "hello");
    properties1.Add(2, 12);
    properties1.Add(3, 34);
    properties1.Add(4, "bye");

    properties1.Print();

    PropertyList properties2;
    properties2.Add(1, "hello");
    properties2.Add(3, 34);


    if(CheckSubset(properties1.mProperties, properties2.mProperties)) // should be true
        cout << "properties2 is subset!" << endl;

    PropertyList properties3;
    properties3.Add(1, "hello");
    properties3.Add(4, 1234);

    if(CheckSubset(properties1.mProperties, properties3.mProperties)) // should be false
        cout << "properties3 is subset!" << endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
Small point about void Add(int tag, T value): why not const T& value just like you did in TypedProperty's constructor. But that's almost nitpicking. –  Sjoerd Oct 29 '12 at 12:40
    
@Sjoerd If I use const T& value, I get this error: error: array used as initializer for this line: properties1.Add(1, "hello"); –  Meysam Oct 29 '12 at 13:17
    
The usual C-string vs C++-strings. A single, additional overload void Add(int tag, const char* value) { mProperties.insert(TypedProperty<std::string>(tag, value)); } might solve that. But one wonders whether the cure is worse than the original problem... –  Sjoerd Oct 29 '12 at 13:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For solving the problem in Print method of PropertyList, you could write a Print method for TypedProperty class, which prints its tag and value.

But about the problem in accessing mValue which you want to do some operations on, I can't think of a way using normal types and templates to get the mValue without engaging your parent class Property with template type of TypedProperty (which seems undesirable). But you could get the address of mValue and cast it to void* to eliminate the type problem. This way you will face another problem, that you can not point to value of a void* pointer, so you can not work with your pointer in parent level. Therefore, you should write a method (implemented by TypedProperty) that takes a void* pointer and casts it to the type defined in child and perform the desired operation.

For example in the following code, I assumed you want to check equality of a value in a TypedProperty with another one of the same type (IsEqual method).

Now you can implement simply CheckSubset using IsEqual (checking two elements would be like: superItr->IsEqual(subItr->GetValue())).

class Property
{
    public:
        Property(){};
        Property(const int tag)
            : mTag(tag) {}
        virtual ~Property() {}
        virtual void* GetValue() = 0;
        virtual bool IsEqual(void* value) = 0;
        virtual void Print() = 0;
        int mTag;
        bool operator<(const Property &property) const
        {
            return mTag < property.mTag;
        }
};


template< typename T >
class TypedProperty : public Property
{
    public:
        TypedProperty (const int tag, const T& value)
            : Property(tag), mValue(value){}
        void* GetValue()
        {
            return &mValue;
        }
        bool IsEqual(void* value)
        {
            return *((T*)value) == mValue;
        }
        void Print()
        {
            cout << "Tag: " <<  mTag << ", Value: " << mValue << endl;
        }
        T mValue;
};

typedef std::tr1::shared_ptr<Property> PropertyPtr;

class PropertyList
{
    public:
        PropertyList(){};
        virtual ~PropertyList(){};
        template <class T>
            void Add(int tag, T value) 
            {
                PropertyPtr ptr(new TypedProperty<T>(tag, value));
                mProperties.insert(ptr);
            }
        void Print()
        {
            cout << "-----------" << endl;
            for(set<PropertyPtr>::iterator itr = mProperties.begin(); itr != mProperties.end(); itr++)
            {
                (*itr)->Print();
            }
        }
        set<PropertyPtr> mProperties;
};
share|improve this answer

What you want, cannot be done with the current design.

Your approach fails with std::set<Property>.

std::set<Property> will slice. That means that it will only copy the Property part and forget to copy the additional TypedProperty<T> members.

As a result, inside PropertyList::print(), there is no way to access the mValue.

If you want to store TypedProperty<T>s inside a std::set, you must use some sort of pointer. I.e. either std::set<Property*>, or a smart pointer version.

share|improve this answer
    
I still cannot figure out how to implement the Print and CheckSubset methods given my data is stored in std::set<Property*>. Can you please elaborate? –  Meysam Oct 29 '12 at 13:10
    
@Meysam Two options: 1) To switch on mTag and each case will have a different cast. 2) Add a virtual void print(std::ostream &os) const = 0 to Property and a void print(std::ostream &os) const { os << mValue; } in TypedProperty. I prefer the latter. CheckSubset() could do a simular trick: either a large switch with lots of casts, or one additional virtual function in the base class, although the fact that one could compare TypedProperty<int> with TypedProperty<std::string> will complicate matters (but I think they are solvable with a check on mTag and a single cast). –  Sjoerd Oct 29 '12 at 13:52
    
@Meysam As it is hard to answer your question in a single comment, maybe you could turn it into a new question, with a link to this question in the introduction of your question. I think you'll get better answers that way. –  Sjoerd Oct 29 '12 at 14:03

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