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In PHP when we include or require some file using some initializers like the following. How can we overcome filepath issues which occurs if you include the same initializer in a sub-directory or different location.

<?php

// settings
$settings = array('config');

foreach ($settings as $setting) {
    require_once "../system/settings/{$setting}.php";
}

// neutrals
$neutrals = array('functions');

foreach ($neutrals as $neutral) {
    require_once "../system/neutrals/{$neutral}.php";
}

// helpers
$helpers = array('database', 'file', 'logger', 'user', 'session', 'database');

foreach ($helpers as $helper) {
    require_once "../system/helpers/{$helper}.php";
}

// models
$models = array('test');

foreach ($models as $model) {
    require_once "../system/models/{$model}.php";
}

?>

Above script is in a file all_initializer.php. The hurdle here is that i cant use the same initializer in a public sub-directory or other location as it will occur fatal errors (if its a required file) of file not found.

EDIT

For e.g. I am using this initialzer in a public folder in a index.php file then there's a sub-directory in the public folder public/sub. How can I use the same initializer in public/sub/index.php as I used in public/index.php ?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't really understand the specific problem you're describing, but there are a number of widely used solutions for file path problems and inconsistencies. Many sites and systems today have a configuration variable for the main path, which you can use everywhere else and then if the path changes, you only need to change one variable. –  Ynhockey Oct 29 '12 at 12:48
    
I didn't understand what your problem is... –  pankar Oct 29 '12 at 12:50
    
@Ynhockey edited for u. –  Yousuf Memon Oct 29 '12 at 12:52
    
This is stackoverflow.com community which never returns me thirsty. –  Yousuf Memon Oct 29 '12 at 13:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could use the file_exists to avoid fatal errors

// neutrals
$neutrals = array('functions');

foreach ($neutrals as $neutral) {
    if (file_exists("../system/neutrals/{$neutral}.php") 
    {
        require_once "../system/neutrals/{$neutral}.php";
    }
    else
    {
        // Do some logging here so as to know that something went wrong
    }
}

As for the path issues you are referring to, you can include this file from anywhere so long as you supply the proper base path for your operations. Defining a ROOT_PATH in your index.php file would help you detect where your script is and what it needs to load.

So for instance if you have this structure:

/system
/system/neutrals
/system/models
/public
/public/index.php

in your index.php you can define a ROOT_PATH constant that will be used throughout the application and serve as a point of reference.

// this points to the folder that has /public and /system
define('ROOT_PATH', dirname(dirname(__FILE__)))); 

You can also have a constant just for your system folder

define('SYSTEM_PATH', ROOT_PATH . '/system'); 

and then all your require_once declarations become:

require_once SYSTEM_PATH ."/neutrals/{$neutral}.php";

EDIT: Based on additional information in the question

Structure:
/all_includes.php
/system
/system/neutrals
/system/models
/public
/public/index.php
/public/sub/index_sub.php

In index.php you define

// this points to the folder that has /public and /system
define('ROOT_PATH', dirname(dirname(__FILE__)))); 

and then:

require_once ROOT_PATH . '/all_includes.php';

to do your initialization. The same thing happens in the public/sub/index_sub.php.

Your all_includes.php becomes:

// neutrals
$neutrals = array('functions');

foreach ($neutrals as $neutral) {
    if (file_exists(ROOT_PATH . "/system/neutrals/{$neutral}.php") 
    {
        require_once ROOT_PATH . "/system/neutrals/{$neutral}.php";
    }
    else
    {
        // Do some logging here so as to know that something went wrong
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This really helped. –  Yousuf Memon Oct 29 '12 at 13:01
    
I edited the file based on your edits in the question. Have a look and let me know if this was what you were looking for. –  Nikolaos Dimopoulos Oct 29 '12 at 13:05
    
So thats my exact site folder :) –  Yousuf Memon Oct 29 '12 at 13:06
    
I didn't vote down :( but accepted –  Yousuf Memon Oct 29 '12 at 13:14
    
@YousufIqbal Don't worry about the vote up/down. The key is that you got the answer that helped you solve your question. :) –  Nikolaos Dimopoulos Oct 29 '12 at 13:17

The way most of the php frameworks work is similar to the following, zend framework works like this:

Declare a constant APPLICATION_PATH and then make all the paths relative to this one.

define("APPLICATION_PATH", "/var/www/mysite");

And then all your requires will be relative to your APPLICATION_PATH.

require_once APPLICATION_PATH ."/system/helpers/{$helper}.php";

* With this approach you can include files from whatever script without issues. Because all the paths are going to be relative to your APPLICATION_PATH.

share|improve this answer
    
You can event make php decide your APPLICATION_PATH automatically. Write something like that: define("APPLICATION_PATH", ___DIR___); then use it to require other files. –  Oleg Liski Oct 29 '12 at 13:05
    
Doing this you are defining your constant relative to the (current working directory) of the script where you declare the constant. If that is what you want , is ok, but that will force me to declare the constant in an specific file. Otherwise i can do it in any place, just like the people from zend framework do it . They declare the APPLICATION_PATH in the application.ini file and then include this file in the bootstrap.php. I think this way is more flexible. –  slash28cu Oct 29 '12 at 13:09
    
Usually I do it in beginning of script that is included in every other file. In other words - init script, which later loads all other files. This way is more flexible in situation when you need to install it to different servers - in your case, you will need to update PATH everytime you move to a new server. –  Oleg Liski Oct 29 '12 at 13:13
    
I understand you, but if you have any chance take a look at the boostraping section of zend framework. Is only one line that defines the application_path for the entire project. In case you need to change is just a single line. –  slash28cu Oct 29 '12 at 13:15
    
I know :) However, changing even one line is not always fun :) –  Oleg Liski Oct 29 '12 at 13:21

Simple.. don't use relative paths... in your foreach loops, you could do:

require($_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'].'/system/thing.php');
share|improve this answer

the pathing problem can be solved in this way, you have one file that is always in the same place. for example you have (this is you public html)

.
..
folder/subfolder/filetoinclude.php
folder2/includein.php
thefilefolder/thefile.php

ok now in the file php you have a variable

$path=dirname(__FILE__);

this will always give you the absolute path to that file, then you ca use this $path variable and build your include paths around it. in this example you have to include $path.'../folder/subfolder/filetoinclude.php'; The pint is to alway use the same point of origin, and not use relative paths. and then you can make a custom include function in thefile.php, and then the things get really easy.

share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to stackoverflow.com. Read this stackoverflow.com/questions/how-to-answer –  Yousuf Memon Oct 29 '12 at 13:04

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