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I'm new to Windows desktop programming (or at least I haven't done it since, um, Windows 3.0). I've got VS 2012 Express for Desktop installed. I have a default forms-based project created and running. Now I'd like to add in a Windows API with the following lines per pinvoke.net:

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
static extern bool SetLayeredWindowAttributes(IntPtr hwnd, uint crKey, byte bAlpha, uint dwFlags);

I'm getting two errors for this code:

  1. The modifier 'extern' is not valid for this item (on the closing square bracket of the attribute)
  2. Expected class, delegate, enum, interface, or struct (on bool)

What am I doing wrong?

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Where did you specify this? It should be placed in a class definition. –  CodeCaster Oct 29 '12 at 13:29
    
@CodeCaster -- ah, duh, that's it, thanks. I didn't put it in a class. Inside a class it works, of course. –  Ghopper21 Oct 29 '12 at 13:31
    
This is not appropriate in a Winforms app. Instead use the Form.TransparencyKey and Opacity properties, you'll get the internal call to SetLayeredWindowAttributes() for free. Use the Region property for shape. –  Hans Passant Oct 29 '12 at 14:23
    
@HansPassant -- ok, it did feel strange to be hooking in those Windows APIs given all the newer classes. I'm guessing there are similar wrappers using WPF if I end up doing it with WPF? –  Ghopper21 Oct 29 '12 at 15:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Make sure you're placing this declaration within a class definition, not outside it.

Typically, you'd keep P/Invokes within a static class called NativeMethods, which you then invoke using a call like NativeMethods.SetLayeredWindowedAttributes(...). For example:

internal static class NativeMethods
{
    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    public static extern bool SetLayeredWindowAttributes(IntPtr hwnd, uint crKey, byte bAlpha, uint dwFlags);
}

If you want to call it without a type reference, then you need to put it in the same class as you're calling it in, but unless you're sure you won't use this P/Invoke anywhere else, I wouldn't recommend it.

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Thanks for the NativeMethods tip also! –  Ghopper21 Oct 29 '12 at 14:23

Because you must encapsulate this code on class

class MainClass 
{
   [DllImport("user32.dll")]
   static extern bool SetLayeredWindowAttributes(IntPtr hwnd, uint crKey, byte bAlpha, uint dwFlags);
   .....

}
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