Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anybody explain the following codes to me? It is from the Android source code.

The first line looks to me is to initialize an integer array, but what about those codes enclosed in braces? I mean are those codes syntax correct since the braces part seems to be tangling?

    // high priority first
    mPriorityList = new int[mNetworksDefined];
    {
        int insertionPoint = mNetworksDefined-1;
        int currentLowest = 0;
        int nextLowest = 0;
        while (insertionPoint > -1) {
            for (NetworkAttributes na : mNetAttributes) {
                if (na == null) continue;
                if (na.mPriority < currentLowest) continue;
                if (na.mPriority > currentLowest) {
                    if (na.mPriority < nextLowest || nextLowest == 0) {
                        nextLowest = na.mPriority;
                    }
                    continue;
                }
                mPriorityList[insertionPoint--] = na.mType;
            }
            currentLowest = nextLowest;
            nextLowest = 0;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Do you mean the { at line 3? It's perfectly fine, it's a block. Think about it as a if(true) { ... } –  ignis Oct 29 '12 at 13:34
    
The outer block at line 3 is to say that the variables insertionPoint, currentLowest` and nextLowest are no longer used after the closing }. The block with the new[] could have been placed in a separate initialisation method. –  Joop Eggen Oct 29 '12 at 13:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yeah those code blocks are absolutely fine. They are viable syntax. Rather they are useful.

What happens there is, the code is just shifted to an unnamed-block, to provide them a block scope. So, any variables defined inside that block won't be visible outside.

int[] a = new int[10];
{
    int x = 10;
    a[0] = x;
    System.out.println(x);
}

System.out.println(x);  // Error. x not visible here.

So, those braces just creates a local block scope, that's it. Nothing more special in them. Though, you won't feel the magic of those blocks in the above code.

This way of coding is generally used to minimize the scope of your local variables, which is absolutely a good idea, specially when, the variables created inside that block won't be used anywhere else.

So, if used without those braces, those variables will just hang around, waiting for the garbage collector to free them up, at the same time, enjoying the trip towards the end of current scope, that might be a very long method.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot! this is very helpful –  user1783037 Oct 29 '12 at 14:42
    
@user1783037. You're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 29 '12 at 16:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.