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I am trying to mock a local object, using Mockito Framework, that is being created from the spring application context; But every time I run the application its fails to replace the original object with the mocked object.

Here is the original class's code spinets:

public void executeMyJob(){
    ApplicationContext springContext = ApplicationContextUtil.getApplicationContext();

    MusicEAO music= (MusicEAO) springContext.getBean("MusicEAO");
    List<Brand> dataList =music.getAll();

    ......
}  

I want to mock the MusicEAO so when the getAll() method is called, it will use the mock object.

Below is my test class code snippets:

@Mock
MusicEAO musicEAO;
when(musicEAO.findAll()).thenReturn(myDefinedList);

How can I resolve this issue?

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2 Answers 2

It's hard to tell from the cod you posted but the problem might be that you are mocking MusicEAO in your test but the code you are executing is using a Spring ApplicationContext to get a reference to the MusicEAO bean.

Your original class should not use MusicEAO music= (MusicEAO) springContext.getBean("MusicEAO"); but instead have the bean injected by Spring using @Autowired through a constructor or a setter method (or other dependency injection method). You test will then be able to easily inject a mock version.

 class MyJobClass {

   MusicEAO music;

   @Autowired
   public MyJobClass(MusicEAO musicEao) {
      this.music = musicEao;
   }

   public void executeMyJob(){

       List<Brand> dataList =music.getAll();

       ......
   } 
}

When you say

every time I run the application it fails to replace the original object with the mocked object

You shouldn't have to run the application to run a unit test for this class - are you asking how to inject mocks into a running application?

.

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Yes, you use spring for dependency injection, so instead of brutally pulling the MusicEAO from the applicationContext, let spring inject it for you. As Bedwyr said, spring injects dependencies using setter or constructor), you can do the same in your tests! Build an instance of the class under test and inject all the dependencies yourself. In unit testing, you shouldn't be using Spring at all. –  Alban Oct 29 '12 at 15:12
    
Thanks for the reply , just giving you few quick updates ... I can't change the original code .I observed when I make the MusicEAO music variable as global and make it with @Resource I can mocked that object. So my question is is there any way out by which we can inject the mocked object to the spring for above mentioned context (MusicEAO music= (MusicEAO) springContext.getBean("MusicEAO");) –  Satya Oct 30 '12 at 5:48

It doesn't work this way. In your current code :

  • The following instance is the one in your test : @Mock MusicEAO musicEAO;

  • But in your production code, you are using Spring to acquire the Music instance : MusicEAO music= (MusicEAO) springContext.getBean("MusicEAO");

Nowhere you seem to say to spring that you want the Music mock to be affected to MusicEAO bean name.

If you are doing a Unit Test I would recommand you to avoid messing with Spring, if that's an integration test, then you'll have to find a way to create the mock and pass it over to spring.

For example you can create the mock in the Spring context, autowire it in your test.

Also, I wouldn't recommand the use of static calls in this situation to acquire the Spring context in order to finaly get a hold on the Music object. it makes me think of Spring as a registry which isn't really the case. Spring is a container. Instead you should try to refactor your code in such a way that the Music bean is wired (@Autowired, setters, etc.) in ExecutionJob.

Then it would be even easier to write a Unit Test with JUnit and Mockito, with annotations like @Mock and @InjectMocks.

Hope that helps.

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