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How to implement a timeout while loop in C++ using boost::datetime?

something like:

#define TIMEOUT 12

while(some_boost_datetime_expression(TIMEOUT))
{
    do_something(); // do it until timeout expires
}

// timeout expired
share|improve this question
    
you can use other approaches. – logoff Oct 29 '12 at 14:34
3  
You're right, but let's pretend I'd like to do as per question... – Gianluca Ghettini Oct 29 '12 at 14:36
    
Is do_something, a long running job that you want to cancel after timeout, or it is a short job that you want to do repeatedly till timeout? – Vikas Oct 29 '12 at 15:15
    
the latter: do_something() is a short job that executes repeatedly till timeout – Gianluca Ghettini Oct 29 '12 at 22:54
    
@G_G, In that case check my solution using boost.asio, deadline timer and datetime. – Vikas Oct 30 '12 at 6:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use Boost::deadline_timer for timeouts. Constant check of value in loop is overkill for CPU.

share|improve this answer
1  
not actually: an empty while() loop would be overkill, in this case we got a do_something() function which is executed in non-zero time. – Gianluca Ghettini Oct 29 '12 at 15:08
    
+1 use asio for this – Sam Miller Oct 30 '12 at 0:10

You can just check the time difference:

boost::posix_time::ptime now = boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::local_time();
while((boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::local_time() - now) < boost::posix_time::milliseconds(TIMEOUT ) )
{
    // do something
}

But instead of doing something like that you might rethink your design.

share|improve this answer
    
This is simple and just what I needed. I needed to run a check on something, but only want to do that for a max period of time, after which, if it (what I am checking) is not in the state I wish, then, carry on, regardless of the consequences. – Jon Nov 27 '15 at 14:39

You'll first want to mark the time you start, then calculate the difference between the current time and the time you started. No built-in boost datetime expression will work exactly like you describe. In boost datetime terminology: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_51_0/doc/html/date_time.html the duration of your timeout is a "time duration", and the point you start is a "time point".

Suppose you want to be accurate to within a second, and have a 4 minute 2 second interval.

using namespace boost::posix_time;
ptime start = second_clock::local_time();

gives you a time point to start your timing

ptime end = start + minutes(4)+seconds(2);

gives you a point in time 4 minutes and 2 seconds from now.

And then

( second_clock::local_time() < end )

is true if and only if the current time is before the end time.

(Disclaimer: this is not based off actually writing any boost datetime code before, but just reading the docs and example code over at the boost website.)

share|improve this answer

This can easily be done with boost.Asio. Start a deadline_timer as one async process. It cancels the event loop when it expires. Keep posting your work to the same event loop till it is running. A working solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

class timed_job
{
    public:
        timed_job( int timeout ) :
            timer_( io_service_, boost::posix_time::seconds( timeout ) )  // Deadline timer
        {
        }

        void start()
        {  

            // Start timer
            timer_.async_wait
                (
                 boost::bind
                 (
                  &timed_job::stop, this
                 )
                );

            // Post your work
            io_service_.post
                (
                 boost::bind
                 (
                  &timed_job::do_work, this
                 )
                );

            io_service_.run();
            std::cout << "stopped." << std::endl;
        }

    private:
        void stop()
        {  
            std::cout << "call stop..." << std::endl;
            io_service_.stop();
        }

        void do_work ()
        {  
            std::cout << "running..." << std::endl;

            // Keep posting the work.
            io_service_.post
                (
                 boost::bind
                 (
                  &timed_job::do_work, this
                 )
                );
        }

    private:
        boost::asio::io_service io_service_;
        boost::asio::deadline_timer timer_;
};

int main()
{
    timed_job job( 5 );
    job.start();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Easily? I have to scroll to see the full code :-p. – mavam Oct 30 '12 at 6:26
    
@MatthiasVallentin, Lines of code doesn't has nothing to do with simplicity of code. But I'm working with asio for some time now and it comes natural to me. If you think it was not easy to understand, I'll add some more comments. Let me know. – Vikas Oct 30 '12 at 6:29
    
While I agree that an asynchronous approach with firing callback on timeout expiration is the right way to think about the problem, I still wouldn't call this amount of boilerplate an "easy" approach. It certainly accomplishes the job but requires significant understanding of an external library. However, an instantiation of one io_service object per timer can become costly when using smaller timeout values, You may pass in reference to it instead but then cannot hide the implementation anymore. – mavam Oct 30 '12 at 17:32

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