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I have a properties file where the order of the values is important. I want to be able to iterate through the properties file and output the values based on the order of the original file.

However, since the Properties file is backed by, correct me if I'm wrong, a Map that does not maintain insertion order, the iterator returns the values in the wrong order.

Here is the code I'm using

    Enumeration names = propfile.propertyNames();
    while (names.hasMoreElements()) {
        String name = (String) names.nextElement();
        //do stuff
    }

Is there anyway to get the Properties back in order short of writting my own custom file parser?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you can alter the property names your could prefix them with a numeral or other sortable prefix and then sort the Properties KeySet.

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Yes, that had occurred to me. That might be the simplest workaround. –  James McMahon Aug 21 '09 at 15:16
2  
Probably not going to give what you want though as string sortable doesn't match integer sortable for mixed strings. 11-SomePropName will sort before 2-OtherPropName if you're sorting strings by their natural sort value. –  Chris Kessel Aug 21 '09 at 18:28
    
This is actually what I ended up doing. I was only dealing with four values and commons configuration need too many dependencies which would have complicated my build. –  James McMahon Aug 21 '09 at 20:09

It's quite simple. You just have to extend Properties and override both put() and keys() methods.

E.g.

class LinkedProperties extends Properties {

    private final LinkedHashSet<Object> keys = new LinkedHashSet<Object>();

    public Enumeration<Object> keys() {
        return Collections.<Object>enumeration(keys);
    }

    public Object put(Object key, Object value) {
        keys.add(key);
        return super.put(key, value);
    }
}
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Perfect! Thanks! –  neu242 Feb 15 '11 at 7:46
    
Great solution! –  peceps Jul 7 '11 at 13:44
1  
It would be safer to create your class as a wrapper around Properties, rather than extending it. Only overriding those methods makes assumptions about how the underlying class works (the assumption that putAll() uses put()), and you could run into situations where your keys set is incorrect. –  Jordy Boom May 14 '12 at 18:43
    
Maybe also override remove? –  Samuel Dec 9 '12 at 15:21
    
You should really override remove() and clear() as well - otherwise you'll get NullPointerExceptions on save()! Also you should add synchronized as it is in the parent's methods unless the collection used for the keys is thread safe. –  Michael Wyraz Jan 31 '13 at 14:27

Nope - maps are inherently "unordered".

You could possibly create your own subclass of Properties which overrode setProperty and possibly put, but it would probably get very implementation-specific... Properties is a prime example of bad encapsulation. When I last wrote an extended version (about 10 years ago!) it ended up being hideous and definitely sensitive to the implementation details of Properties.

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I was afraid of that. I'm looking at the Properties code right now and I see exactly what you mean. The backing implementation should really should be a settable delegate. Can you recommend any alternatives? Like would the Apache Commons configuration help me out? –  James McMahon Aug 21 '09 at 14:49
    
Just a quick correction, Java does have a implementation of Map, LinkedHashMap, that DOES maintain insertion order. –  James McMahon Aug 21 '09 at 14:50
    
@nemo: Yes, but that's a map specifically designed for that. Maps in general aren't ordered. I believe Spring has its own properties file reader which you might find useful. –  Jon Skeet Aug 21 '09 at 14:54
    
extend Properties, override put() and store the keys in an internal List. use said list to iterate the properties in order. –  james Aug 21 '09 at 15:24

Apache Commons Configuration might do the trick for you. I haven't tested this myself, but I checked their sources and looks like property keys are backed by LinkedList in AbstractFileConfiguration class:

public Iterator getKeys()
{
    reload();
    List keyList = new LinkedList();
    enterNoReload();
    try
    {
        for (Iterator it = super.getKeys(); it.hasNext();)
        {
            keyList.add(it.next());
        }

        return keyList.iterator();
    }
    finally
    {
        exitNoReload();
    }
}
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This looks interesting, but the using one piece of the commons requires loading several other pieces. I ended up going with a quick and dirty solution. –  James McMahon Aug 21 '09 at 20:11
    
Most of the dependencies are optional. For a simple PropertiesConfiguration you only need Commons Lang and Commons Collections. –  Emmanuel Bourg Oct 17 '11 at 11:17

Dominique Laurent's solution above works great for me. I also added the following method override:

public Set<String> stringPropertyNames() {
    Set<String> set = new LinkedHashSet<String>();

    for (Object key : this.keys) {
        set.add((String)key);
    }

    return set;
}

Probably not the most efficient, but it's only executed once in my servlet lifecycle.

Thanks Dominique!

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In the interest of completeness ...

public class LinkedProperties extends Properties {

    private final LinkedHashSet<Object> keys = new LinkedHashSet<Object>();

    @Override
    public Enumeration<?> propertyNames() {
        return Collections.enumeration(keys);
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized Enumeration<Object> elements() {
        return Collections.enumeration(keys);
    }

    public Enumeration<Object> keys() {
        return Collections.enumeration(keys);
    }

    public Object put(Object key, Object value) {
        keys.add(key);
        return super.put(key, value);
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized Object remove(Object key) {
        keys.remove(key);
        return super.remove(key);
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized void clear() {
        keys.clear();
        super.clear();
    }
}

I dont think the methods returning set should be overridden as a set by definition does not maintain insertion order

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You must override also keySet() if you want to export Properties as XML:

public Set<Object> keySet() { return keys; }

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An alternative is just to write your own properties file using LinkedHashMap, here is what I use :

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.URL;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.LinkedHashMap;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

import org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils;
import org.apache.commons.io.LineIterator;

public class OrderedProperties {

    private static Map<String, String> properties = new LinkedHashMap<String, String>();

    private static OrderedProperties instance = null;

    private OrderedProperties() {

    }

    //The propertyFileName is read from the classpath and should be of format : key=value
    public static synchronized OrderedProperties getInstance(String propertyFileName) {
        if (instance == null) {
            instance = new OrderedProperties();
            readPropertiesFile(propertyFileName);
        }
        return instance;
    }

    private static void readPropertiesFile(String propertyFileName){
        LineIterator lineIterator = null;
        try {

            //read file from classpath
            URL url = instance.getClass().getResource(propertyFileName);

            lineIterator = FileUtils.lineIterator(new File(url.getFile()), "UTF-8");
            while (lineIterator.hasNext()) {
                String line = lineIterator.nextLine();

                //Continue to parse if there are blank lines (prevents IndesOutOfBoundsException)
                if (!line.trim().isEmpty()) {
                    List<String> keyValuesPairs = Arrays.asList(line.split("="));
                    properties.put(keyValuesPairs.get(0) , keyValuesPairs.get(1));
                }
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            lineIterator.close();
        }
    }

    public Map<String, String> getProperties() {
        return OrderedProperties.properties;
    }

    public String getProperty(String key) {
        return OrderedProperties.properties.get(key);
    }

}

To use :

    OrderedProperties o = OrderedProperties.getInstance("/project.properties");
    System.out.println(o.getProperty("test"));

Sample properties file (in this case project.properties) :

test=test2
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See https://github.com/etiennestuder/java-ordered-properties for a complete implementation that allows to read/write properties files in a well-defined order.

OrderedProperties properties = new OrderedProperties();
properties.load(new FileInputStream(new File("~/some.properties")));
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