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I have a class that uses the Thread class:

class A
{
    public Thread thread
    { get; set; }
}

Should I implement IDisposable and set Thread property to null?

class A : IDisposable
{
    public Thread Thread
    { get; set; }

    protected bool Disposed
    { get; set; }


    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.Disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                if (Thread != null)
                    Thread = null;
            }

            Disposed = true;
        }
    }
}

Or not?
Why?

share|improve this question
3  
Dispose is mostly for unmanaged resources. In your case, when your class goes out of scope, your Thread object will eventually be garbage collected anyway. – Robert Harvey Oct 29 '12 at 15:05
    
Often Dispose is used too free memory faster... – rekire Oct 29 '12 at 15:06
    
@rekire Nope, it's not, and it doesn't have that effect even if you tried. (At least if you're referring to managed memory.) – Servy Oct 29 '12 at 15:06
1  
@jgauffin Thread does not have Dispose method. – Nick Oct 29 '12 at 15:10
1  
@RobertHarvey You can, technically, but it usually doesn't do what you want it to do. If you are using the variable across the scope of several methods then it's not useful even though it's possible. It would end up disposing of the resource before you were done with it. – Servy Oct 29 '12 at 15:15
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You implement IDisposable only when your class is handling an unmanaged object, resources or other IDisposable objects. A Thread is not an unmanaged object and will get garbage collected when nothing is referencing it or when the process handling it is terminated. Since Thread is not implementing IDisposable, your class referencing it does not need to implement it either.

Optionally, for IDisposable within the scope of a method, they can be wrapped in a using statement and the Dispose() method is automatically called when the scope is exited.

share|improve this answer
1  
Mostly true, but if Thread implemented IDisposable, you could just wrap a using statement around it. No need to re-implement IDisposable in the surrounding class. – Robert Harvey Oct 29 '12 at 15:09
4  
@RobertHarvey The purpose of a thread is to do something asynchronous, so if you wrap your thread in a using statement, and start your thread in it, then your thread would immediately be disposed once the thread is started. Maybe the thread is not finished yet it would be disposed immediately. So I do not think wrapping a thread object around a using statement -even if you could - would be a good idea. – Maarten Oct 29 '12 at 15:17
    
@Maarten: Why would it get disposed as soon as the thread start? It should only get disposed when exiting the scope of the using statement. – LightStriker Oct 29 '12 at 15:20
    
@Marc-AndréJutras: That's right, but if you want to start your thread "fire and forget style," you can't wrap it in a using statement (in our contrived hypothetical), because it would get cleaned up right after it is started. – Robert Harvey Oct 29 '12 at 15:23
1  
@Maarten: Which is probably a good reason why Thread doesn't implement IDisposable. :P – Robert Harvey Oct 29 '12 at 15:30

It depends what your thread is doing. If your thread is performing a long running task that may run indefinitely, then I would consider that thread as a resource (which will not be garbage collected). For example consider if the thread is designed to poll some state indefinitely, or consume items from a queue (like a thread-pool thread consumes tasks or a TCP server consumes new connections) etc. In this case, I would say the natural effect of disposing your class would be to free up this thread resource. Setting it to null is not really useful in this case. Rather Dispose should probably involve flagging a synchronization event (or maybe a CancellationToken) to notify the thread that it should finish up its infinite task, and then the disposing thread should wait some time for the thread to finish (join). As always with joins, be careful of a deadlock scenario and consider some alternative action if the thread refuses to terminate. For obvious reasons I would not do this join in the finalizer.

As an example of what I'm meaning, consider the scenario where your class A is actually class MyTcpListener, designed to listen and wait for new TCP connections on a given port indefinitely. Then consider what you expect following (somewhat unlikely) code to do:

using (MyTcpListener listener = new MyTcpListener(port:1234))
{
    // Do something here
}

// Create another one. This would fail if the previous Dispose
// did not unbind from the port.
using (MyTcpListener listener = new MyTcpListener(port:1234))
{
    // Do something else here
}

Assuming I know the constructor of MyTcpListener creates a listener thread, I would expect that after the Dispose call has returned that the MyTcpListener would no longer be bound to the TCP port - i.e. that the TCP listener thread would have fully terminated. It goes without saying that if you didn't provide some mechanism to stop the listener that there would be a resource leak. The stopping mechanism could be a call to some method "Stop", but I personally think the "Dispose" pattern fits this scenario more cleanly since forgetting to stop something does not generally imply a resource leak.

Your code may call for different assumptions, so I would suggest judging it on the scenario. If your thread is short-running, e.g. it has some known finite task to complete and then it will terminate on its own, then I would say that disposing is less critical or perhaps useless.

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