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I noticed the following using Python 2.5.2 (does not occur using 2.7):

#!/usr/bin/python

import sys

for line in sys.stdin:
   print line,

Output:

$ echo -e "one\ntwo\nthree" | python test.py
$ one
$ two
$ three

as expected. However, if I import subprocess to the this script:

#!/usr/bin/python

import sys
import subprocess

for line in sys.stdin:
   print line,

Output:

$ echo -e "one\ntwo\nthree" | python test.py
$ two
$ three

What happened to the first line of output?

Update:

I think I may have discovered the root of the problem. I had a file named time.py in my cwd. A time.pyc is being created every time I run the script with subprocess imported, suggesting that ./time.py is also being imported. The script runs normally if I delete the .pyc and time.py files; however, there is still the question of why a subprocess import would cause ./time.py to be imported as well?

I have narrowed it down even further to the exact line in time.py that causes the strange behaviour. I have stripped down the working dir and file content to just that which affects the output:

test.py

#!/usr/bin/python

import sys
import subprocess

for line in sys.stdin:
   print line,

time.py

#!/usr/bin/python

import sys

for line in sys.stdin:
   hour = re.search(r'\b([0-9]{2}):', line).group(1)

Running test.py with any kind of input results in the first line of output being omitted and time.pyc being created.

share|improve this question
    
I can not confirm it on 2.4.3: "echo -e "one\ntwo\nthree" | python test.py" results in "-e one two three" for the last one example. –  tb- Oct 29 '12 at 15:33
1  
@tb-: You must use the bash shell. echo is a builtin, and tcsh (for example) does not support the -e flag. –  Bill Lynch Oct 29 '12 at 15:44
    
hm, I can't actually confirm this at all: python2.5.6 on Ubuntu –  SilentGhost Oct 29 '12 at 15:49
    
@sharth with bash, the result is the same (without the -e) –  tb- Oct 29 '12 at 16:09
1  
@SilentGhost: I'm getting these results with 2.5.2 on Debian 5.0.6. Python 2.6.6 and 2.7.1 on the same machine behave as expected. –  alh Oct 29 '12 at 16:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sounds like your local time.py will be imported instead of the global time module. You might want to rename it, or at least start checking if it was run as a script or imported as a module.

This will prove it for you if you want to test it.

#!/usr/bin/python

import sys

# Test that script was run directly
if __name__=='__main__':
    for line in sys.stdin:
       hour = re.search(r'\b([0-9]{2}):', line).group(1)
else:
    print 'Imported local time.py instead of global time module!'
    sys.exit(1)
share|improve this answer

print line, before 2.7 did not put out a newline so it overwrote the first line. Lose the comma and the result will be the same.

share|improve this answer
2  
why is line two\n was not overwritten? Besides, import subprocess shouldn't have affected it. –  SilentGhost Oct 29 '12 at 15:36
    
The behavior of the trailing comma was not changed in 2.7 –  Ned Batchelder Oct 29 '12 at 15:56
    
The purpose of the trailing comma in print is to omit the newline, docs.python.org/2/reference/… "A '\n' character is written at the end, unless the print statement ends with a comma" –  dbr Oct 30 '12 at 5:11

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