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My Code :

<a href="javascript:void(0);" onclick="myFunction(this)">Call Function</a>​

$(window).load(function () {
    function myFunction(param) {
        console.log("called");
    }
});

as you can see, I can't access to that function (is inside the load scope). I can't also use handlers inside the load, because I'm in a scenario where (don't ask me why, it's a google maps infowindow policy) handlers will be deleted when I create some element (so, where I should invoke that function from an object).

So, is there a "trick" to call a function inside the load scope?

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1  
am I missing something? why not create the function outside of the load scope? –  Jon Taylor Oct 29 '12 at 15:54
    
You just seem to be declaring the function inside window.load.. So why not move it outside.. >> –  Sushanth -- Oct 29 '12 at 15:55
    
problem is either the ultra simple solutin provided, or you have grossly over simplified the example... and all the other parts of question ramble around too much to really follow –  charlietfl Oct 29 '12 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

You can declare it as a variable outside the scope of the load function, and the set the value inside the scope of the load function, and it will be accessible, but it will only call the function after the variable is set i.e. after the load function has executed :

var myFunction;

$(window).load(function () {
    myFunction = function(param) {
        console.log("called");
    }
});

FIDDLE

Or how I'd do it:

<a href="#" id="myAnchor">Call Function</a>​

--

$(function() {
    $("#anchor").on('click', function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();  
        console.log("called");
    });
});

Google maps have their own way of handling this:

google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function(event) { ...
share|improve this answer
    
while it works, what is the point? I'd be interested to know if there is an advantage to coding this way, or is this just a workaround? –  Jon Taylor Oct 29 '12 at 15:58
    
I would'nt do it myself, as I seems like a strange way to do things? I'd rather just attach a click handler to the anchor and not use inline JS, problem solved! –  adeneo Oct 29 '12 at 15:59
    
true, I was just curious. Yeah unfortunately it seems he can not use load handlers. I just assumed my method of declaring the function outside the load would be the preferred method (if not using handlers), am I wrong? –  Jon Taylor Oct 29 '12 at 16:00
    
I'm assuming he needs to access things after they are loaded, so yes, declaring a function outside of load scope, generally causes problems –  Jlange Oct 29 '12 at 16:05
    
I've created a bunch of Google maps, with custom styles, clicking on markers bring up dialogs, popups, custom stuff, you name it, and I've yet had a problem with a click function defined with the native Google style, nor have I ever used jQuery's load function with a Google map, as all you have to do is create an event listener with some event bound to a marker or something else on the map, and do whatever you like in the function. –  adeneo Oct 29 '12 at 16:09

why not do this?

function myFunction(param) {
    console.log("called");
}

$(window).load(function () {
    //Any code you actually need in the load
});
share|improve this answer
    
Because on myFunction() I manage some vars that are visibles only into load function. –  markzzz Nov 5 '12 at 13:21

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