Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use Git to manage my repository, which contains a CVS module from elsewhere. I am not going to make any local changes to the CVS repo, I just want to update it regularly. Currently I make everything in the CVS repo under Git's control, after cvs update, I then commit it in Git.

Is there any better (simpler or cleaner) way which allows me to track my Git repo while letting me update the CVS module easily?

share|improve this question
    
If you aren't going to commit anything to CVS then you could consider adding your update/commit/merge steps into a script so that you can run it all in one go. –  Burhan Ali Oct 30 '12 at 8:22

1 Answer 1

What you may want to do is create a submodule in git, export the cvs module to this git submodule using cvs export and commit it to your repo. That keeps the master branch clean of any additional cvs files.

Once you've done that you use a cvs on commit script to keep the submodule up to date when there is a commit - this would be my preferred option. In pseudocode it may look like this:

#!/bin/sh

mv -R <submodule>/.git /tmp/
rm -rf <submodule>/*
mv -R  /tmp/.git <submodule>/
cd <submodule>

cvs -d<path> export <module>

find . | xargs git add

git commit -a -m "CVS Updates for `date`"

Adding the script to CVS:

  • You start with a check out of CVSROOT and copy the script there, not forgetting to make the script executable. cvs -d<path> co CVSROOT
  • Copy the script into the directory
  • Add the script with cvs add
  • Add the filename of the script to checkoutlist
  • Add an entry to loginfo which will case the script to be run.
  • Commit
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.