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show values as colored representation

I get a decimal number between 1 to 5 which I want to represent like the above mentioned image. This image for example shows a value 3.7

What will be the best possible way to display it using html + css

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closed as not a real question by Pekka 웃, M42, brenjt, ЯegDwight, Graviton Oct 31 '12 at 3:26

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
this is possible without javascript easily if you can change your value to a percentage value –  Blowsie Oct 29 '12 at 16:48
    
@Blowsie I was thinking that the OP needs to change values from 1 to 5 on some button click or something(which require javascript). I was expecting that from all. I misunderstood. –  Mr_Green Oct 29 '12 at 17:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Assuming that you can turn the decimal into a percentage, this is doable with pure CSS. Or, you can use a small snippet of JavaScript to set/adjust the percentage value.

enter image description here

IE7+, Chrome, etc.

Example 1

Simple example, no script, minimal markup: http://jsfiddle.net/GqK6p/6/

HTML

<div id="progress"></div>
<ul id="mask">
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
</ul>

CSS

#wrapper { position: relative; height: 30px; width: 180px; }
#progress { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; z-index: 0; background-color: red; width: 74%; height: 100%; }
#mask { position: absolute; z-index: 1; height: 100%; }
LI { float: left; border: 4px solid #aaa; height: 22px; width: 22px; }

Example 2

A bit more polished example, allowing for inner styling of each box: http://jsfiddle.net/GqK6p/2/

This also shows the usage of percentage-based width for the bar.

HTML

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="progress"></div>
    <ul id="mask">
        <li><div></div></li>
        <li><div></div></li>
        <li><div></div></li>
        <li><div></div></li>
        <li><div></div></li>
        <li><div></div></li>
    </ul>  
</div>

CSS

#wrapper { position: relative; height: 30px; width: 180px; }

/* set width to whatever percentage makes sense based on decimal value */

#progress { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; z-index: 0; background-color: red; 
    width: 59%; height: 100%; }

#mask { position: absolute; z-index: 1; height: 100%; }
LI { float: left; border: 4px solid #aaa; height: 22px; width: 22px; }
LI > DIV { border: 1px solid #555; height: 20px; }

Example 3

Here's an animated variation which shows how to dynamically adjust the width of the progress bar with JavaScript: http://jsfiddle.net/GqK6p/4/

var progress = $("#progress");
var width = 0; // use whatever starting value makes sense

setInterval(function(){

    // increment/process as desired
    if( ++width > 100 ){
         width = 0;
    }        

    progress.css("width",  width + "%");       
}, 25);​

HTML 5 Progress Element

As a side note, the HTML 5 progress element would probably be the semantic choice for this type of information, but browser support isn't complete yet, and I don't think any capability exists to style progress.

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You could do this with a UL and some DIVs.

<ul>
<li>
    <div class="on"></div>
    <div class="on"></div>
    <div class="on"></div>
    <div class="on"></div>
    <div class="on"></div>
    <div class="on"></div>
    <div class="on"></div>
    <div class="on"></div>
    <div class="on"></div>
    <div class="on"></div>
</li>

Here's a quick example:

http://jsfiddle.net/EfpPr/5/

Obviously you'd just need a little bit of javascript/jQuery to set the DIVs to be on/off as required.

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Why would you even wrap that in an unordered list? The list does nothing. –  DanMan Oct 29 '12 at 17:12
    
@DanMan - The list LI elements serve as containers for the DIV elements which make up each block. Alternatively you could contain the DIVs in DIVs themselves instead of using the UL/LI combination or use any other tag you felt like. I simply felt that a UL was a nice simple solution. –  Billy Moat Oct 29 '12 at 17:15

Depending on your markup, which you haven't posted, I'd go for 2 background images. One with the red bar in it, and the other with all the boxes, which are transparent in the middle. Then, with a little calculation (mapping your 1-5 range to either percent or pixels), you just shift the red bar around with background-position.

You won't see a difference when the bar ends up behind one of the opaque areas, but that's not too bad, is it?

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You could create an image like the following with one row for each possible value (excuse the incomplete graphic):

enter image description here

apply this as a background image to a div. Then change the background-position according to your decimal value with some simple JQuery.

var theValue = 3;
var theOffset = 0-(27*theValue); // replace "27" with the height of one row of the image

$('#value').css('backgroundPosition','0 ' + theOffset + 'px');

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer
    
That'd be overkill. –  DanMan Oct 29 '12 at 17:03
    
Look pretty simple to me. One image loaded. One DIV. Three lines of code –  uʍopǝpısdn Oct 29 '12 at 17:25
1  
If you like creating an image with about 100 of those rows, sure. –  DanMan Oct 29 '12 at 17:28

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