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Consuming a Web service using Javascript

Please note that I'm still getting used to JavaScript. Basically I need to write an HTML file that uses Javascript to call a couple of web service methods (from the same server as the HTML file) without using Ajax or probably much of anything else that we'd have to install on there separately. We already have the web service up and running fine, as well as some JS. This needs to work for IE, FF, and Chrome, including for computers that are a couple of years "behind the times". What is a really simple way to do this? Again, I'm still kind of getting my feet wet with JavaScript, so I'm having a hard time following and using some of the examples I've seen. Thanks!

EDIT: Here's an example of the kind of thing I've been trying:

<html>
<head>
   <title>Hello World</title>
   <script language="JavaScript">
      var iCallID;
      function InitializeService(){
     alert("spam");
     try {
            service.useService(<WSDL address>, 
                  "HelloWorldService");
     } catch (e) {
        alert(e.message);
     }
     alert("spam");
         service.HelloWorldService.callService("HelloWorld");
     alert("spam");
      }
      function ShowResult(){
     alert("spam");
         alert(event.result.value);
     alert("spam");
      }
</script>

I get "spam", then "Object doesn't support this property or method", then nothing.

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marked as duplicate by bfavaretto, Jasper, fresskoma, FishBasketGordo, Kjuly Oct 30 '12 at 0:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7  
Ajax is not something that you have to install separately. –  Pointy Oct 29 '12 at 16:57
    
Is Ajax something that you at least have to enable separately? –  Panzercrisis Oct 29 '12 at 18:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ok, AJAX has been around since donkey's years, really. But since you're not familiar with JS, here's a little copy-paste function you could use:

function ajax(url,method,data)
{
    var xhr;//ajax object
    data = data || {};//default ajax request
    method = method || 'POST';
    url = url || 'default/url/ajax';
    try
    {//normal browsers
        ret = new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    catch (error)
    {//older IE browsers, including dead IE6
        try
        {
            ret= new ActiveXObject('Msxml2.XMLHTTP');
        }
        catch(error)
        {
            try
            {
                ret= new ActiveXObject('Microsoft.XMLHTTP');
            }
            catch(error)
            {
                throw new Error('no Ajax support?');
            }
        }
    }
    if (typeof ret !== 'object')
    {//if fails (almost impossible)
        throw new Error('No Ajax, FFS');
    }
    ret.open(method, url, true);//open ajax connection
    ret.setRequestHeader('X-Requested-With', 'XMLHttpRequest');
    ret.setRequestHeader('Content-type', 'application/x-www-form-urlencode');
    ret.onreadystatechange = function()
    {
        if (this.readyState === 4 && this.status === 200)
        {
            var response = this.responseText;
            //code you want to see executed when the call was successful
        }
    };
    return ret.send(data);
}

Usage:

ajax('your/ajax/url','POST','id=12');

This will send an ajax request back to the server, with a POST parameter id, value 12... play around with that. A few things that can be useful: JSON, and -though I'm not a big fan- jQuery, it has a ready built-in $.ajax method, just pass an object literal and you're good to go.

Feel free to edit this function as you please

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If you want to consume a web service you must create a connection between the running page on the client machine and the server hosting the service. The umbrella term for doing this is AJAX. It is not a separate technology you install but a term that describes the use of the XMLHttpRequest object available in the JavaScript DOM. There are plenty of resources describing cross browser usage...

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/AJAX/Getting_Started

And many JavaScript libraries have cross-browser implementations that you can use without worrying about the details. jQuery, MooTools, Prototype... etc.

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