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Goal: to output only data that is above 1 and below -1

or

output data that is between 1 and -1

I have the basics of awk and can print column 2 (where my data is) notice I also specified a range of 0-1

awk '/[0-1]/  {print $2}' test.dat

I am also needing to have the line number so I added NR...

awk '/[0-1]/  {print $2 NR}' test.dat

To make sure I am clear, the point is to identify which lines of the data are outside of the acceptable range, so we can ignore them in our analysis. (ie anything bigger than 1 or lower than -1 is too much of a change).

Any help you can provide would be great. I have pasted some sample data below. Thanks!

http://pastebin.com/7tpBAqua

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I know shell scripting and awk (language) technically count as programming but I feel this question would get more attention if asked on unix.stackexchange.com instead of here. –  Wug Oct 29 '12 at 17:25
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@Wug True, but this isn't bash scripting, this is awk, a language. –  Dave Newton Oct 29 '12 at 17:26
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I still think the Great Grey Neckbeards would know better. –  Wug Oct 29 '12 at 17:28
    
This is my first post, I hope I was clear enough. –  un5t0ppab13 Oct 29 '12 at 17:42
    
awk '/[0-1]/' does not match numbers between 0 and 1. It matches any line that contains a character between '0' and '1' inclusive - i.e. any line that contains either a '0' or a '1' character (at least in the most common locales). The fact that the vast majority of the sample numbers happen to have |x| < 1 is coincidental. –  twalberg Oct 29 '12 at 17:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
awk -F'[ ,]' 'NR>2{for (i=2;i<=NF;i++) if ($i<-1 || $i>1) { print NR; next } }' file
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Hey Ed, I ran that and it looks great! I'm going to manually check and verify. Thanks ;D –  un5t0ppab13 Oct 29 '12 at 21:54
    
Almost there I think.... my output still counted the first two lines (which are not wanted, they are actually words and not data): 1 2 66 71 72 88 98 99 100 101 116 124 139 140 141 142 154 155 156 158 173 174 175 176 238 240 – user1783588 2 mins ago edit –  un5t0ppab13 Oct 29 '12 at 22:03
    
Also, not sure how this worked: -F'[ ,]' –  un5t0ppab13 Oct 29 '12 at 22:05
    
@user1783588 Filter out the first two lines with tail +3 file | awk -F'[ ,]' '{for (i=3;i<=NF;i++) if ($i<-1 || $i>1) { print NR; next } }' –  Tobi Lehman Oct 29 '12 at 22:08
    
@user1783588 That is a stand-alone one-liner, replace file with your filename. –  Tobi Lehman Oct 29 '12 at 22:12

Not sure if you want to evaluate the data in every column, or if there's a specific column you need to test. Testing a single column is simplest; testing multiple or all columns is a fairly simple repetitive extension of the pattern. Since you mention column 2 specifically, let's assume you want to print column 2 only when it is between -1 and 1:

awk -F, '($2 >= -1) && ($2 <= 1) { print $2 }'

To test for the field being greater than 1 or less than -1 instead:

awk -F, '($2 <= -1) || ($2 >= 1) { print $2 }'

Printing a different field, or the entire line instead ($0) should be fairly obvious. To examine each field, either simply repeat the entire ($2 >= -1) && ($2 <= 1) { print $2 } clause for each field you're interested in (which quickly gets verbose), or something like this (not tested):

awk -F, '{ for (i = 1; i <= NF; ++i) if (($i >= -1) && ($i <= 1)) print $i; }'
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1  
I learned something from your answer, my attempt at an answer involved sed and egrep. –  Tobi Lehman Oct 29 '12 at 18:08
    
Thank you for your response twalberg. Could you assist me in printing only the line number? I know you can use NR to show the line number. So how would I conditionally print only line numbers that are say above 1 and below -1? In my data set there are 6 data fields, then a new line, when I posted it doesn't show like this.... –  un5t0ppab13 Oct 29 '12 at 18:15
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Just replace $2 with NR. Here is an example: awk -F, '($2 >= -1) && ($2 <= 1) { print NR }' test.dat –  Tobi Lehman Oct 29 '12 at 18:18
    
@user1783588 See Tobi's comment if you only need to print the line number if a single field is off. If you need to flag any line that has one (or more) fields that are off, something like this should work: awk -F, '{ flag=0; for (i = 1; i <= NF; ++i) if (($i >= -1) && ($i <= 1)) flag=1; if (flag) print NR; }' –  twalberg Oct 29 '12 at 18:27
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For instance: the second to last line should be output but the last line should not. Thank you kindly for all your help. It has been years since I have coded so this is really a big help. –  un5t0ppab13 Oct 29 '12 at 18:39

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