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Why this code isn't working ? (this is not the actual code, but a simplified version

#include <stdio.h>
#define NUMBER 5
int function( int NUMBER );

int main (void)
{
    function( NUMBER );
    return 0;

}
int function( int NUMBER )
{
    printf("Hi %d\n", NUMBER);
    return 0;
}
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2  
int function( int 5 ); - what? –  raina77ow Oct 29 '12 at 17:55
    
sorry, the %d inside the function was missing –  jotape Oct 29 '12 at 17:58
    
And how does it give any sense to that statement? After all, why do you use this #define clause here? Are you trying to create a function that works with 5 if no value is specified? –  raina77ow Oct 29 '12 at 18:00
    
that I want to pass NUMBER (5) as a parameter, to print it in the function. –  jotape Oct 29 '12 at 18:01
    
@jotape: Which you did successfully in main. However, functions do not predict their input, they take arguments as variables. This way you can also write function(10), function(100), and function(some_other_variable). Functions are reusable pieces of code. –  Ed S. Oct 29 '12 at 18:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted
#define NUMBER 5
int function( int NUMBER );

#define is a pre-processor macro, simple text replacement. So, let's look at what you are really trying to compile:

int function( int 5 );

Which makes no sense. This part is fine:

int main (void)
{
    function( NUMBER );
    return 0;    
}

Because you are calling function with the value 5, but the signature of function should look like this:

int function( int x );  // the argument is a variable, x
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So NUMBER is not a variable ? –  jotape Oct 29 '12 at 17:59
1  
no, NUMBER is not a variable. It's like a cut and paste operation that happens before compilation. –  Lee Taylor Oct 29 '12 at 18:00
    
@jotape: As Lee said (as well as my answer), no, it is not. However, even then it wouldn't make much sense given how you're attempting to use it. When you write something like void foo(int x) x is a variable local to the function foo. It does not exist outside the function. –  Ed S. Oct 29 '12 at 18:01
    
Or rather (@Lee): it's like a search-and-replace operation that happens before compilation. –  Henning Makholm Oct 29 '12 at 18:01
    
well, same kind of idea (search for NUMBER and paste in 5) ;-) –  Lee Taylor Oct 29 '12 at 18:02
 #define NUMBER 5
 int function( int NUMBER );

is the same as:

 int function( int 5 );

You cannot have a number for a parameter name.

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Sorry, something missing –  jotape Oct 29 '12 at 17:57
    
So a constant is what I need? –  jotape Oct 29 '12 at 18:00
4  
What you need is to read a book about C Programming and learn the basics. –  ouah Oct 29 '12 at 18:02

It doesn't work because what you are doing makes no sense. Read the answers above to understand why.

It should be like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#define NUMBER 5

void function ( int );  // a function prototype, saying 'function' accepts an int as the first argument.

int main ( void ) // the 'main' is called when the program runs.
{
   function ( NUMBER );
   return 0;  // returning zero means that no error was encounter in the program
}

void function( int i )
{
   printf ( "Hi %d\n", i );
}
share|improve this answer
    
You meant to write x where you wrote i in function, here: printf("Hi %i\n", i). –  Ed S. Oct 29 '12 at 18:02

After preprocessing, your code looks like this:

int function( int 5 );

int main (void)
{
    function( 5 );
    return 0;

}
int function( int 5 )
{
    printf("Hi %d\n", 5 );
    return 0;
}

That is, all occurrences of the symbol NUMBER are replaced with the integer constant 5 before the code is compiled. This works fine in the call to function, but not in the declaration or definition; a parameter name cannot be an integral constant expression.

You will need to change the declaration and definition so that the parameter is not named NUMBER.

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The line with int function( int NUMBER ); is a function prototype, yes? You should omit NUMBER in it. Also, your function definition should have its own input variable name - don't use NUMBER, so make it like this:

int function( int num )
{
    printf("Hi\n");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Just take out int before NUMBER and it will work. DEFINE's just replace your text before compilation, it's a preprocessor command. It is useful for when you want to change something that will apply to your whole code by just changing it in the header of your code or for making things clearer. However, in your case, it's not really necessary, you could have just put a constant

const int NUMBER 5

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