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So I am trying to convert my web app over to being OOP-based since that's how I learned to program in the first place. I have all my functions and everything defined, but I'm running into a problem.

Let's say in the index.php I open a script tag and create an object function:

<script type="text/javascript">
function myObject(_string){
   this.string = _string;

   this.get_string = function(){
       return this.string;
   }
}
</script>

No biggie.

Now if I call it, it works fine if I do this:

var my_object = new myObject("this is a string");
console.log(my_object.get_string) // logs "this is a string"

but if I wrap it in a domReady, the object never gets created, and calling my_object returns a reference error:

$(document).ready(function() {
     var my_object = new myObject("this is a string");
     console.log(my_object); // returns reference error
}); 

I get this same problem if I embed a function inside my object and try to call it:

<script type="text/javascript">
    function myObject(_string){
       this.string = _string;

       this.get_string = function(){
           return this.string;
       }

       this.set_string = function(new_string){
            this.string = new_string;
       }
    }

    my_object = new myObject("this is a string");
    my_object.set_string("this is a new string"); // returns reference error
    my_object.set_string() // Returns reference error
    my_object.set_string // returns a string containing the function
</script>

Seriously confused over this. Can anyone help?

share|improve this question
    
Use .toString() instead. –  Brad Oct 29 '12 at 18:53
    
Can you make a JSFiddle (jsfiddle.net)? Your first example, which you claim works for you, does not in fact work. –  Trevor Dixon Oct 29 '12 at 18:55
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should work regardless of where your code is placed

function myObject(_string){
   this.string = _string;

   this.get_string = function(){
       return this.string;
   };

   this.set_string = function(new_string){
        this.string = new_string;
   };
}

And call the like:

var my_object = new myObject("this is a string");
console.log(my_object.get_string()) // will log "this is a string"
share|improve this answer
    
This was working, I just apparently have no access to the object via the console. Thanks for your great answer. –  StephenRios Oct 29 '12 at 19:37
    
That is likely because the definition of your myObject is within some function scope. if you can modify that to window.myObject = function(x) { … }, you will have access to it from the console. –  techfoobar Oct 30 '12 at 3:19
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You have to properly initiate your function inside class definition:

this.get_string = function(){...}
share|improve this answer
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Your "methods" are no properties of you object, you have assigned them to (implizit) global variables. Use

function myObject(_string) {
    this.string = _string;
    this.get_string = function() {
        return this.string;
    }
}

Btw, this method is conveniently called toString, then it also would be used when the object is casted to a string. And you might want to use a local "private" variable instead of the public property .string, which makes your getters and setters quite superfluous:

function myObject(string) {
    // the parameter is like 
    // var string;
    this.toString = function() {
        return string;
    };
    this.setString = function(new_string) {
        string = new_string;
    };
}
share|improve this answer
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