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here is the game board just to give you an idea of how it looks like (this board will be expanded to a 7x6)

what i want to do is detect a winner when 2 colors are in a row similar to the game "conmect four" taking into account diagonal combos too. BUT i want to do this with out using brute-force enumeration..

this the code that goes behind the program i have made I'm not asking for solution i just need a bit of help on an effective algorithm

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {

        private Button[] btns;
        private Button[] btns2;

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            btns = new Button[] { button2, button3 };
            btns2 = new Button[] { button4, button5 };


        }

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

            foreach (var btn in btns)
            {
                btn.Enabled = false;
                btn.BackColor = Color.LightCyan;
            }

            foreach (var btn in btns2)
            {
                btn.Enabled = false;
                btn.BackColor = Color.LightCyan;
            }
        }
        public int state;
        int cc = 0;
        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            foreach (var btn in btns)
            {
                  {
                    if (!btn.Enabled)
                    {
                        btn.Enabled = true;

                        if (cc == 0)
                        {
                            cc = 1;
                            btn.BackColor = Color.Red;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            cc = 0;
                            btn.BackColor = Color.Yellow;
                        }
                        return;
                    }

                }
            }       
        }

        private void button6_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            foreach (var btn in btns2)
            {
                if (!btn.Enabled)
                {
                    btn.Enabled = true;

                    if (cc == 0)
                    {
                        cc = 1;
                        btn.BackColor = Color.Red;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        cc = 0;
                        btn.BackColor = Color.Yellow;

                    }

                    return;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Will this ever expand more than a 2x2? –  Ray K Oct 29 '12 at 18:58
    
i will expand it to a 7x6 –  Tacit Oct 29 '12 at 18:59
    
Is there a limit on the colors? Like only 2 or 3? –  noMAD Oct 29 '12 at 19:03
    
yes red and yellow only –  Tacit Oct 29 '12 at 19:24
1  
Actually, on a 2x2 boards, if you are counting diagonals, it's really easy. If player 1 goes first, at the end of player 1's second turn, they win. It's impossible for player 1 not to win on that turn. –  Matt Burland Oct 30 '12 at 13:16

2 Answers 2

First, for efficiency and sanity, I'd keep the state of my board in a 2D array.

Second, for detecting win states, given that you start the game with a (presumably) empty board, you can only get into a win state when a button changes state. And if the button changing state puts you into a win state, then that button must be involved in that win state (i.e. it must be part of you line).

So...you don't need to brute-force the whole board. You only need to determine if the button that just changed state is part of a line. In other words, look only at the buttons to above, below, to the left and to the right (and maybe diagonal, your question wasn't clear if you included diagonals) to see if they are the same color as the one you changed. If any one of them is, then this is a win state. This is where using a 2D array will make you life much easier. If the button at (x, y) is changed, then you only need to check (x-1, y), (x+1, y), (x, y-1) and (x, y+1), (and maybe diagonals) making sure to do appropriate boundary checks, of course.

Extending this to 3, 4 or more in a row isn't much more difficult, except you need to remember you might be in the middle of a row rather than one end or the other.

Unoptimized Pseudo Code for 2 in a row (note, I've switched to compass points to avoid up-left, up-right, etc because I feel it gets a bit unwieldy):

// cell is the cell that last changes, it has an x and y property and a color property
// board is a member variable, a 2D array of cells. Note [0,0] is the upper-left (NW) corner of the board.
// boardHeight and boardWidth are member variable with the dimensions of the board
// board[boardWidth-1, boardHeight-1] is the lower-right (SE) corner of the board
// returns true for a win, false otherwise
function checkWin(cell) returns bool {
    // check west
    if (cell.x > 0 && board[cell.x - 1, cell.y].color == cell.color)
        return true;
    // check northwest
    if (cell.x > 0 && cell.y > 0 && board[cell.x-1, cell.y-1].color == cell.color)
        return true;
    // check north
    if (cell.y > 0 && board[cell.x, cell.y-1].color == cell.color)
        return true;
    // check northeast
    if (cell.y > 0 && cell.x < boardWidth && board[cell.x+1, cell.y-1].color == cell.color)
        return true;
    // checking the other directions is left as an exercise for the reader, hopefully you get the point
    return false;
}

If you are doing more than 2, I'd think about a recursive function to count the number of matching cells to the left, right, up, down, and diagnoals

// k is the number of cells in a row for a win
function checkWin(cell) returns bool {
    // check west / east
    int count = checkWest(cell);
    if (count > k)
         return true;
    count += checkEast(cell);
    if (count > k)
         return true;
    // check nw / se
    count = checkNW(cell);
    if (count > k)
         return true;
    count += checkSE(cell);
    if (count > k)
         return true;
    // and so on, checking N/S and NE/SW
    return false;
}

function checkWest(cell) returns int {
    // base case, check the boundaries!
    if (cell.x == 0)
        return 0;
    // base case, the cell next to this one doesn't match
    if (board[cell.x-1,cell.y].color != cell.color)
        return 0;
    // recursion, check the next cell in the line
    return 1 + checkWest(board[cell.x-1,cell.y]);
 }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I was about to write a similar answer. This is about the most efficient solution as it's O(1) despite the size of the board. –  Babak Naffas Oct 29 '12 at 19:12
    
+1, nice solution –  Caleb Jares Oct 29 '12 at 19:12
    
would it be posible for u towrite some pseudocode please (will also include diagonal) –  Tacit Oct 30 '12 at 13:29
    
@Tacit: I've edited my answers with hopefully enough to get the idea. I included the case of checking for longer runs too. –  Matt Burland Oct 30 '12 at 13:58
    
i'm probably sounding very stupid right now.. im trying to get it working but its not happening for me i know you have given me the perfect solution but im finding it very diff to get it working :( –  Tacit Oct 31 '12 at 13:48

For an n by m board and a winning combo of k in a row:

int n, m, k;
byte[,] color = new byte[n, m]; // for two colors, a 0 would correspond to blue, 1 would be red, or however you like

for (int i = 0; i <= n - k; i++) // don't check all the way to the right because there's no room to win
{
    for (int j = 0; j <= m - k; j++) // don't check all the way down because there's no room to win
    {
        // Check here for a win. Check for a win to the right, down right, and down
    }
}
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