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I am trying to reverse a doubly linked list using iterative approach and i'm struck on the part where my original list is being modified even though i'm not using a pointer to pointer style modification of original list.

This is the reverse function i am using, head is a local variable declared in main like Node* head = NULL; and is already populated with a set of values.

Node* reverse_iterative(Node* head)
{
    if(head == NULL || head->next == NULL)
        return head;

    Node *prev, *current=head, *temp;
    while(current != NULL)
    {
        current->prev = current->next;
        current->next = temp;
        temp = current;
        current = current->prev;
    }
    return temp;
}

This is how i used this in main :

Node* rev = NULL;
rev = reverse_iterative(head);

Here is the output i got:

original list: 15 <=>25 <=>35 <=>45 <=>55 <=>65 <=>75 <=>
making the list actually reverse: 75 <=>65 <=>55 <=>45 <=>35 <=>25 <=>15 <=>
after reversing, the original list now: 15 <=>

I couldn't get the part where my original head node was being modified.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Look carefully at your while-loop, and consider the following statement on the initial iteration of the loop:

current->next = temp;

What is in temp at the time of this assignment? Exposing more of the code, we have:

Node *prev, *current=head, *temp;
while(current != NULL)
{
    current->prev = current->next;
    current->next = temp;
    temp = current;
    current = current->prev;
}

Note that temp is uninitialized and thus an undefined pointer value. Your original head-ptr next ptr is being reset to garbage held in the uninitialized temp.

Fix this by doing the following:

Node *current=head, *temp=NULL;
while(current != NULL)
{
    temp = current->prev;
    current->prev = current->next;
    current->next = temp;
    temp = current;
    current = current->prev;
}

I've not had a chance to test it, but that should get you closer to what you're looking for.

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i've changed the code including your changes but that doesn't really change anything. if i call reverse_iterative(head) any changes being made to head inside the function shouldn't really effect the head pointer of main right ? –  zolo Oct 29 '12 at 19:46
1  
@Abhilash They will not effect the head pointer, but they will effect the node it points to. That node is now at the tail of the list. you should be setting your head pointer to be the result of your reverse function. When you reverse the list, the new head pointer should be set to the new head (which used to be the tail). Without that your old head pointer will reference the last node in the list. Try head = reverse_iterative(head); to see what I mean. –  WhozCraig Oct 29 '12 at 19:49
    
@Abhilash if you don't want the original list modified you can either (a) make a copy and reverse that, or (b) reverse it again after dumping the reversed content. I.e. run head = reverse_iterative(head); a second time. –  WhozCraig Oct 29 '12 at 19:50
    
thanks that helped. but is there any better to not modify the original list and yet achieve a reversed list, apart from making a copy or doing it twice ? –  zolo Oct 29 '12 at 19:59
    
@Abhilash Please clarify. Is the purpose of your reverse function to reverse the list, or make a reverse copy of the list. The latter will be easy enough. Just make a copy of the list, then reverse the copy. You'll have two lists, one backward of the other. –  WhozCraig Oct 29 '12 at 20:03

If I understand you correctly, you don't want your original list to be modified at all.

But the loop modifies the original element. For example, current starts out pointing to the head element and you then modify its next and prev. This means the original head element is now modified.

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Yes, I don't want my original list to be modified, is there any way i can do it with out actually making a copy or doing the reversal twice ? –  zolo Oct 29 '12 at 20:01
1  
Not really, no. If what you want is a list where the order is reversed, then you cannot reuse the old elements. You need separate elements if they are to point in opposite directions. –  Mikkel K. Oct 29 '12 at 20:04

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