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This is a follow-up to this question where I posted this program:

#include <algorithm>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>
#include <ctime>
#include <iomanip>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <chrono>

class Stopwatch
{
public:
    typedef std::chrono::high_resolution_clock Clock;

    //! Constructor starts the stopwatch
    Stopwatch() : mStart(Clock::now())
    {
    }

    //! Returns elapsed number of seconds in decimal form.
    double elapsed()
    {
        return 1.0 * (Clock::now() - mStart).count() / Clock::period::den;
    }

    Clock::time_point mStart;
};

struct test_cast
{
    int operator()(const char * data) const
    {
        return *((int*)data);
    }
};

struct test_memcpy
{
    int operator()(const char * data) const
    {
        int result;
        memcpy(&result, data, sizeof(result));
        return result;
    }
};

struct test_memmove
{
    int operator()(const char * data) const
    {
        int result;
        memmove(&result, data, sizeof(result));
        return result;
    }
};

struct test_std_copy
{
    int operator()(const char * data) const
    {
        int result;
        std::copy(data, data + sizeof(int), reinterpret_cast<char *>(&result));
        return result;
    }
};

enum
{
    iterations = 2000,
    container_size = 2000
};

//! Returns a list of integers in binary form.
std::vector<char> get_binary_data()
{
    std::vector<char> bytes(sizeof(int) * container_size);
    for (std::vector<int>::size_type i = 0; i != bytes.size(); i += sizeof(int))
    {
        memcpy(&bytes[i], &i, sizeof(i));
    }
    return bytes;
}

template<typename Function>
unsigned benchmark(const Function & function, unsigned & counter)
{
    std::vector<char> binary_data = get_binary_data();
    Stopwatch sw;
    for (unsigned iter = 0; iter != iterations; ++iter)
    {
        for (unsigned i = 0; i != binary_data.size(); i += 4)
        {
            const char * c = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(&binary_data[i]);
            counter += function(c);
        }
    }
    return unsigned(0.5 + 1000.0 * sw.elapsed());
}

int main()
{
    srand(time(0));
    unsigned counter = 0;

    std::cout << "cast:      " << benchmark(test_cast(),     counter) << " ms" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "memcpy:    " << benchmark(test_memcpy(),   counter) << " ms" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "memmove:   " << benchmark(test_memmove(),  counter) << " ms" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "std::copy: " << benchmark(test_std_copy(), counter) << " ms" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "(counter:  " << counter << ")" << std::endl << std::endl;

}

I noticed that for some reason std::copy performs much worse than memcpy. The output looks like this on my Mac using gcc 4.7.

g++ -o test -std=c++0x -O0 -Wall -Werror -Wextra -pedantic-errors main.cpp
cast:      41 ms
memcpy:    46 ms
memmove:   53 ms
std::copy: 211 ms
(counter:  3838457856)

g++ -o test -std=c++0x -O1 -Wall -Werror -Wextra -pedantic-errors main.cpp
cast:      8 ms
memcpy:    7 ms
memmove:   8 ms
std::copy: 19 ms
(counter:  3838457856)

g++ -o test -std=c++0x -O2 -Wall -Werror -Wextra -pedantic-errors main.cpp
cast:      3 ms
memcpy:    2 ms
memmove:   3 ms
std::copy: 27 ms
(counter:  3838457856)

g++ -o test -std=c++0x -O3 -Wall -Werror -Wextra -pedantic-errors main.cpp
cast:      2 ms
memcpy:    2 ms
memmove:   3 ms
std::copy: 16 ms
(counter:  3838457856)

As you can see, even with -O3it is up to 5 times (!) slower than memcpy.

The results are similar on Linux.

Does anyone know why?

share|improve this question
1  
since the final question involves only standard c++, why not provide a portable example? – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 29 '12 at 19:41
1  
Some disassembly dumps would be the first step in answering. – aschepler Oct 29 '12 at 19:44
3  
Adding in a memmove test might be interesting too. – aschepler Oct 29 '12 at 19:46
2  
I do think that functors and templates is complete overkill for this benchmark. Just write 3 loops. – Mysticial Oct 29 '12 at 19:46
2  
@StackedCrooked: It's the preferred way in general, because it works over any iterator types over any ranges. memcpy works standard-layout types and non-overlapping ranges. In principle the compiler could deduce that your std::copy call is able to be implemented as a call to memcpy; but compiler writers have lots of other things to worry about too, and the same person who's going to notice the performance hit is also going to be willing to accept the simple fix, so it's probably not a top priority. The C equivalent to std::copy is memmove. – GManNickG Oct 29 '12 at 20:23
up vote 3 down vote accepted

That is not the results I get:

> g++ -O3 XX.cpp 
> ./a.out
cast:      5 ms
memcpy:    4 ms
std::copy: 3 ms
(counter:  1264720400)

Hardware: 2GHz Intel Core i7
Memory:   8G 1333 MHz DDR3
OS:       Max OS X 10.7.5
Compiler: i686-apple-darwin11-llvm-g++-4.2 (GCC) 4.2.1

On a Linux box I get different results:

> g++ -std=c++0x -O3 XX.cpp 
> ./a.out 
cast:      3 ms
memcpy:    4 ms
std::copy: 21 ms
(counter:  731359744)


Hardware:  Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2670 0 @ 2.60GHz
Memory:    61363780 kB
OS:        Linux ip-10-58-154-83 3.2.0-29-virtual #46-Ubuntu SMP
Compiler:  g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.3-1ubuntu5) 4.6.3
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I tested on MacPorts GCC 4.7 and GCC 4.6.2 on Ubuntu. – StackedCrooked Oct 29 '12 at 20:17
    
Even though you didn't formulate an answer I consider this post to be most informative. – StackedCrooked Dec 7 '12 at 20:42

Looks to me like the answer is that gcc can optimize these particular calls to memmove and memcpy, but not std::copy. gcc is aware of the semantics of memmove and memcpy, and in this case can take advantage of the fact that the size is known (sizeof(int)) to turn the call into a single mov instruction.

std::copy is implemented in terms of memcpy, but apparently the gcc optimizer doesn't manage to figure out that data + sizeof(int) - data is exactly sizeof(int). So the benchmark calls memcpy.

I got all that by invoking gcc with -S and flipping quickly through the output; I could easily have gotten it wrong, but what I saw seems consistent with your measurements.

By the way, I think the test is more or less meaningless. A more plausible real-world test might be creating an actual vector<int> src and an int[N] dst, and then comparing memcpy(dst, src.data(), sizeof(int)*src.size()) with std::copy(src.begin(), src.end(), &dst).

share|improve this answer
    
The test is based on a real-life use case where network headers (which often contain integral fields) are parsed from incoming network bytes. – StackedCrooked Oct 29 '12 at 21:37
    
@StackedCrooked: and you do that without worrying about byte order? Anyway, what you're measuring is most likely the compiler's ability to optimize particular invocations. The memcpy invocation you're giving it is certainly the easiest possible one to optimize. If that's what you're going to end up doing, fine, but if the size of the integral type varies, you might want to benchmark a mix of sizes. It will depend on how you invoke memcpy, too: particularly, whether or not the length is a compile-time constant. – rici Oct 30 '12 at 3:35

I agree with @rici's comment about developing a more meaningful benchmark so I rewrote your test to benchmark copying of two vectors using memcpy(), memmove(), std::copy() and the std::vector assignment operator:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <chrono>
#include <random>
#include <cstring>
#include <cassert>

typedef std::vector<int> vector_type;

void test_memcpy(vector_type & destv, vector_type const & srcv)
{
    vector_type::pointer       const dest = destv.data();
    vector_type::const_pointer const src  = srcv.data();

    std::memcpy(dest, src, srcv.size() * sizeof(vector_type::value_type));
}

void test_memmove(vector_type & destv, vector_type const & srcv)
{
    vector_type::pointer       const dest = destv.data();
    vector_type::const_pointer const src  = srcv.data();

    std::memmove(dest, src, srcv.size() * sizeof(vector_type::value_type));
}

void test_std_copy(vector_type & dest, vector_type const & src)
{
    std::copy(src.begin(), src.end(), dest.begin());
}

void test_assignment(vector_type & dest, vector_type const & src)
{
    dest = src;
}

auto
benchmark(std::function<void(vector_type &, vector_type const &)> copy_func)
    ->decltype(std::chrono::milliseconds().count())
{
    std::random_device rd;
    std::mt19937 generator(rd());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<vector_type::value_type> distribution;

    static vector_type::size_type const num_elems = 2000;

    vector_type dest(num_elems);
    vector_type src(num_elems);

    // Fill the source and destination vectors with random data.
    for (vector_type::size_type i = 0; i < num_elems; ++i) {
        src.push_back(distribution(generator));
        dest.push_back(distribution(generator));
    }

    static int const iterations = 50000;

    std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> start, end;

    start = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    for (int i = 0; i != iterations; ++i)
        copy_func(dest, src);

    end = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    assert(src == dest);

    return
        std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(
            end - start).count();
}

int main()
{
    std::cout
        << "memcpy:     " << benchmark(test_memcpy)     << " ms" << std::endl
        << "memmove:    " << benchmark(test_memmove)    << " ms" << std::endl
        << "std::copy:  " << benchmark(test_std_copy)   << " ms" << std::endl
        << "assignment: " << benchmark(test_assignment) << " ms" << std::endl
        << std::endl;
}

I went a little overboard with C++11 just for fun.

Here are the results I get on my 64 bit Ubuntu box with g++ 4.6.3:

$ g++ -O3 -std=c++0x foo.cpp ; ./a.out 
memcpy:     33 ms
memmove:    33 ms
std::copy:  33 ms
assignment: 34 ms

The results are all quite comparable! I get comparable times in all test cases when I change the integer type, e.g. to long long, in the vector as well.

Unless my benchmark rewrite is broken, it looks like your own benchmark isn't performing a valid comparison. HTH!

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting! One minor point: capturing the function as a template argument, e.g. template<typename F> auto benchmark(const F & copy_func) makes the invocation a little faster because it allows inlining (std::function has type-erasure which prevents inlining). This leads to more accurate results because the invocation cost of std::function can "dilute" the time differences of the actual copy function. I tried it and got more diverse results: memcpy: 24 ms, memmove: 22 ms, std::copy: 19 ms, assignment: 22 ms. However, they are still pretty close together and std::copy is the fastest now. – StackedCrooked Oct 30 '12 at 0:09
    
@StackedCrooked: Interesting point about the type erasure. Out of curiosity, is std::copy consistently the fastest with your function template argument change in place? I always get comparable results in between runs but the fastest case isn't always the same, unsurprisingly. – Void Oct 30 '12 at 0:22
    
It get different results each time. I suspect that GCC might be optimizing some of the parts that we want to measure. I don't really know how to check that. – StackedCrooked Oct 30 '12 at 1:10

memcpy and std::copy each have their uses, std::copy should(as pointed out by Cheers below) be as slow as memmove because there is no guarantee the memory regions will overlap. This means you can copy non-contiguous regions very easily (as it supports iterators) (think of sparsely allocated structures like linked list etc.... even custom classes/structures that implement iterators). memcpy only work on contiguous reasons and as such can be heavily optimized.

share|improve this answer
6  
-1 std::copy is a function template and as such does not use non-pointer iterators when you provide pointer arguments. also, it can be and should be specialized for the case of copying PODs. however, when the programmer uses memcpy as opposed to memmove, the programmer is stating that he/she knows that the memory areas are not overlapping, and AFAIK there's no way to state that to std::copy. thus, std::copy should ideally be on a par with memmove, and with memcpy slightly faster. that it currently isn't, with at at least some popular implementations, says something. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 29 '12 at 19:48
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf From the code I checked in libstdc++ I cannot find a specialization for PODs which is why I wrote this answer, either that or the compiler is just bad at optimizing the template code possibly. Can you explain the reason for your -1 a little more please? – Jesus Ramos Oct 29 '12 at 20:05
    
JesusRamos, "std::copy is slower because of it's use of iterators." is incorrect. in the code given it uses just ordinary pointers. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 29 '12 at 20:27
2  
@JesusRamos: The specialization in libstdc++ begins in its std::copy() implementation here. Ultimately it should get to this specialization which contains the underlying call to memmove(). I'm assuming you're referring to the GNU libstdc++ implementation. HTH! – Void Oct 29 '12 at 20:27
    
@Void Thanks, I missed out when reading that. I was looking for a memcpy optimization instead and forgot about memmove. – Jesus Ramos Oct 29 '12 at 20:29

According to assembler output of G++ 4.8.1, test_memcpy:

movl    (%r15), %r15d

test_std_copy:

movl    $4, %edx
movq    %r15, %rsi
leaq    16(%rsp), %rdi
call    memcpy

As you can see, std::copy successfully recognized that it can copy data with memcpy, but for some reason further inlining did not happen - so that is the reason of performance difference.

By the way, Clang 3.4 produces identical code for both cases:

movl    (%r14,%rbx), %ebp
share|improve this answer

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