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Here is a possible definition of std::swap:

template<class T>
void swap(T& a, T& b) {
  T tmp(std::move(a));
  a = std::move(b);
  b = std::move(tmp);
}

I believe that

  1. std::swap(v,v) is guaranteed to have no effects and
  2. std::swap can be implemented as above.

The following quote seems to me to imply that these beliefs are contradictory.

17.6.4.9 Function arguments [res.on.arguments]

1 Each of the following applies to all arguments to functions defined in the C++ standard library, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

...

  • If a function argument binds to an rvalue reference parameter, the implementation may assume that this parameter is a unique reference to this argument. [ Note: If the parameter is a generic parameter of the form T&& and an lvalue of type A is bound, the argument binds to an lvalue reference (14.8.2.1) and thus is not covered by the previous sentence. — end note ] [ Note: If a program casts an lvalue to an xvalue while passing that lvalue to a library function (e.g. by calling the function with the argument move(x)), the program is effectively asking that function to treat that lvalue as a temporary. The implementation is free to optimize away aliasing checks which might be needed if the argument was an lvalue. —endnote]

(thanks to Howard Hinnant for providing the quote)

Let v be an object of some movable type taken from the Standard Template Library and consider the call std::swap(v, v). In the line a = std::move(b); above, it is the case inside T::operator=(T&& t) that this == &b, so the parameter is not a unique reference. That is a violation of the requirement made above, so the line a = std::move(b) invokes undefined behavior when called from std::swap(v, v).

What is the explanation here?

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What is the explanation? What is that which needs explaining? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 29 '12 at 20:28
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas I assumed two things and arrived at a contradiction - std::move(v,v) is guaranteed to do nothing and also it is undefined behavior. Those two statements cannot both be right. So something is wrong with my reasoning or with the assumptions. Which thing is wrong? –  Bjarke H. Roune Oct 29 '12 at 20:32
    
You mean std::swap(v,v), not std::move(v,v), right? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 29 '12 at 20:41
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas Yes, you are right, I mean std::swap(v,v). –  Bjarke H. Roune Oct 29 '12 at 20:45
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3 Answers

[res.on.arguments] is a statement about how the client should use the std::lib. When the client sends an xvalue to a std::lib function, the client has to be willing to pretend that the xvalue is really a prvalue, and expect the std::lib to take advantage of that.

However when the client calls std::swap(x, x), the client isn't sending an xvalue to a std::lib function. It is the implementation that is doing so instead. And so the onus is on the implementation to make std::swap(x, x) work.

That being said, the std has given the implementor a guarantee: X shall satisfy MoveAssignable. Even if in a moved-from state, the client must ensure that X is MoveAssignable. Furthermore, the implementation of std::swap doesn't really care what self-move-assignment does, as long as it is not undefined behavior for X. I.e. as long as it doesn't crash.

a = std::move(b);

When &a == &b, both the source and target of this assignment have an unspecified (moved-from) value. This can be a no-op, or it can do something else. As long as it doesn't crash, std::swap will work correctly. This is because in the next line:

b = std::move(tmp);

Whatever value went into a from the previous line is going to be given a new value from tmp. And tmp has the original value of a. So besides burning up a lot of cpu cycles, swap(a, a) is a no-op.

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I agree that the library implementer controls both std::swap and operator=(T&&) so he can do what he wants as long as the external interface is fulfilled, so in that sense the contradiction is resolved. However, you are then also saying that to implement std::swap in the way shown, it is necessary to make assumptions about the implementation of the standard library that are not guaranteed by the C++11 standard, but that can only be done safely by the implementer of the entire library? Or are you saying that MoveAssignable implies that v = std::move(v) must work, or at least not crash? –  Bjarke H. Roune Oct 29 '12 at 21:07
    
std::vector need not be MoveAssignable for swapping vectors because swap is specialized for vectors. However surely one ought to be able to std::sort a vector<vector<T>> and in that case std::sort requires that vector<T> be MoveAssignable, whether it has been moved from or not. The sort implementor is allowed to self-move-assign this vector<T> (or do whatever it takes to make the algorithm slower). However I don't believe the sort implementor is allowed to assume what the resulting value of a self-move-assignment is, or that it is a no-op. –  Howard Hinnant Oct 29 '12 at 21:41
    
So you are saying that for a type to be MoveAssignable it must allow self move assignment and so cannot assume non-aliasing between this and the parameter in the move assignment operator? That would resolve the contradiction in the question. –  Bjarke H. Roune Oct 29 '12 at 21:51
    
For a type to be MoveAssignable it must allow for self-move-assignment. But it doesn't have to guarantee what the resulting value is. Although there is a statement about what value the lhs has after move assignment, the value of the rhs after move assignment is allowed to be unspecified. When the lhs and the rhs are the same object, take your pick about which of those contradicting requirements to meet. Clients of self-move-assignment should assume the worst (the object is left in an unspecified - but valid - state). –  Howard Hinnant Oct 29 '12 at 21:57
    
My personal guideline is: If someone points out a self-move-assignment or self-swap in my code, I consider it at the very least a performance bug, and except in the case of std::swap, it probably indicates a correctness bug as well. But that's my personal guideline, not what the standard says. –  Howard Hinnant Oct 29 '12 at 22:01
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Then the expression a = std::move(b); gets executed, the object is already empty, in a state where only destruction is well defined. That will effectively be a no-op, as the object on the left and right hand sides is already empty. The state of the object after the move is still unknown but destructible. The next statement moves the contents back from tmp and that sets the object back to a known state.

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How does the object being empty resolve the contradiction in the question? The quote in the question does not seem to me to allow an exception for empty objects. –  Bjarke H. Roune Oct 29 '12 at 20:44
    
@BjarkeH.Roune: Consider the code: int i; i=i; i=5;. The middle statement reads an uninitialized variable, but that does not affect the correctness of the declaration or the later assignment. The quote states that the implementation is allowed to assume that there is no aliasing (i.e. this and rhs to be different objects), that in turn means that it can freely release the resources and then grab them from the argument, which would be problematic in the general case, but in this case the previous line has already taken the resources. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 29 '12 at 20:54
    
@BjarkeH.Roune: [...] Note that the quote does not even say that it is undefined behavior to pass aliased objects, only that the implementation can freely assume that aliasing did not happen. By the time the second line executes the real contents are held somewhere else, so they are not affected by the expression. The guarantees on the object before and after the expression are exactly the same and must be maintained regardless of potential aliasing: the object must be destructible, and that is all that is needed for the third statement. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 29 '12 at 20:58
    
I think assuming no aliasing is only an implication, not the entire statement. I read the quote in the question to allow an implementation to do if (this == &t) exit(1); inside operator=(T&&). If that is allowed then it is not relevant if t is moved from or not, right? –  Bjarke H. Roune Oct 29 '12 at 20:59
    
If you tell me I can assume a statement P then you are also telling me I can do if (!P) exit(1). In other words, if I can assume P but P is not actually true, then that is undefined behavior. Or is that wrong? –  Bjarke H. Roune Oct 29 '12 at 21:01
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I believe that is not a valid definition of std::swap because std::swap is defined to take lvalue references, not rvalue references (20.2.2 [utility.swap])

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Thanks for pointing out the error. I updated the question. However, correcting the error does not seem to me to answer the problem. –  Bjarke H. Roune Oct 29 '12 at 20:37
1  
Same difference: template <typename T> void swap(T&a,T&b) { T tmp(std::move(a)); a=std::move(b); b=std::move(tmp); } –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 29 '12 at 20:37
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