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Maybe this one thing is related to buffer allocation in kernel.
Suppose we want to write a music player, if paging happens, this may lead to choppy low quality music playing.
Video Player, we want to write a real time software, or anything.
We want to assign one of the CPUs to a process, or we make a process very high priority, and then we want to make sure our buffer won't be paged to HDD. How is it done in C and Linux?

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I don't think you can do this from usermode. –  Jonathon Reinhart Oct 29 '12 at 20:51
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Check out mlockall system call, maybe related to what you want. –  sjr Oct 29 '12 at 20:51
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@sjr: You should post that as an answer. mlock is the way to lock a single buffer, but if you also want to make sure your code doesn't get paged out, which would hurt latency just as bad as data getting paged out, you need mlockall. –  R.. Oct 29 '12 at 20:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

By calling:

int mlock(const void *addr, size_t len);//included in header #include <sys/mman.h>

with the start address of the area and its length, the system will garuntee that the memory specified will reside in RAM until you call

int munlock(const void *addr, size_t len);

You can also call the function mlockall(MCL_FUTURE); which will make all your following memory allocations be RAM residents but this poses the risk of allocating more than what's physically available and the result is implementation dependent.

EDIT: For more details, check the following links: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/007908799/xsh/mlock.html
http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/007908799/xsh/mlockall.html

EDIT2: Zan Lynx's comment
Also note that using this to lock more than 64KB (on most Linux systems) will require root privileges. Best way in my opinion is to have a wrapper that launches as root, sets up relaxed real-time and memory lock requirements, switches user IDs and then runs the actual program.


P.S Normally when RT requirments arise, not only you lock your program in RAM but you also set the scheduler into real-time mode, for that you can check sched_setscheduler(..)

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Also note that using this to lock more than 64KB (on most Linux systems) will require root privileges. Best way in my opinion is to have a wrapper that launches as root, sets up relaxed real-time and memory lock requirements, switches user IDs and then runs the actual program. –  Zan Lynx Oct 29 '12 at 21:13
    
Thanks, I added your comment to the answer. –  xci13 Oct 29 '12 at 21:18
    
You might also add that the way to check the limit on locked memory is to execute ulimit -l in the shell. Also this is the way that higher or lower limits might be set (but if not root, one cannot set the limit higher than the hard limit, obtainable by ulimit -lH). The default on older Ubuntu distributions is 32 KiB. –  Hristo Iliev Oct 29 '12 at 21:26

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