Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using regex in C# I should replace one word if it doesn't have specific one before In my example it to replace "Ballmer" with "Steve Ballmer"

In:

...text...Ballmer...text

Result:

...text...Steve Ballmer...text

but if "Steve" already there, I shouldn't add Steve again.

In:

...text...Steve Ballmer...text

Result:

...text...Steve Ballmer...text

Thanks.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use negative lookbehind (?<!...) and positive lookahead (?=...)

string output = Regex.Replace(input, @"(?<!Steve )(?=Ballmer)", "Steve ");
share|improve this answer
    
Say, is it just a matter of taste to use the zero-width match or does it actually have any benefits (performance or otherwise), since this seems to be quite often the difference between our solutions :D. –  m.buettner Oct 29 '12 at 22:18
    
@m.buettner - I see nothing positive on solutions that remove and then insert word that is already in, as you do with Ballmer word. Besides of that, you didn't provide a replacement code in your original answer, as you have added it later based on my answer :) –  Ωmega Oct 29 '12 at 22:23
    
@m.buettner Performance-wise, the difference is probably negligible. But at least you save yourself from repeating a word or phrase (in this case "Ballmer"). And Ωmega, what's wrong with improving one's answer? :-) Answers are editable for a reason, as improvement (even by strangers) is encouraged. –  Wiseguy Oct 29 '12 at 22:28
    
@Wiseguy - Nothing wrong at all, I just pointed on differences and I ended my comment with :) –  Ωmega Oct 29 '12 at 22:30
1  
@Ωmega, yes I didn't want to dispute the legitimation of your answer, since it definitely improved on my answer. I was just wondering whether there are any other reasons than removal of unnecessary duplication. I just usually don't include things like this in my answers because it makes them harder to understand for OPs who are still getting to grips with regex basics (same as the arguably micro optimization of putting ?: in every nevessary subgroup, that doesn't need to be captured) –  m.buettner Oct 29 '12 at 22:30
add comment

Use a negative lookbehind when matching Ballmer:

string result = Regex.Replace(input, @"(?<!Steve )Ballmer", "Steve Ballmer");

This will do exactly what you want. Match any Ballmer that is not immediately preceded by Steve (and a space).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Regular expressions are fun, but it's also worthwhile to try simpler tools before resorting to the big guns. This particular problem can be solved with basic find-and-replace

  1. Replace "Ballmer" with "Steve Ballmer"
  2. Replace "Steve Steve Ballmer" with "Steve Ballmer" (to correct for any oversteving)

Alternatively

  1. Replace "Steve Ballmer" with "Ballmer"
  2. Replace "Ballmer" with "Steve Ballmer"
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.