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Is there any way I can change a non nullable column to nullable in Netezza? (Or will I have to create a new nullable column in the table, transfer the data over, and delete the old column?)

Sorry if the answer shows up with a google search, I've tried looking and haven't been able to find something.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's not much you can do to alter columns in NZ 6.0, aside from add/drop the column itself, setting or clearing the default value, changing the length of a varchar, and renaming a column.

You'll probably have to create a new column, move the data, drop the old column. For a small table, this should be OK.

ALTER TABLE t RENAME COLUMN c to c_old; 

ALTER TABLE t ADD COLUMN (c bigint);

UPDATE t set c = c_old;

ALTER TABLE t DROP COLUMN c_old CASCADE;

However, if the table is large:

Because of how netezza executes update statements, it may just be better to create a whole new table and move the data over. NZ requires a groom of the original table afterwards to delete the old version of the updated records.

CREATE TABLE t_new ( c bigint ) DISTRIBUTE ON (c);

INSERT INTO t_new SELECT c FROM t;

ALTER TABLE t RENAME to t_old;

ALTER TABLE t_new RENAME to t;

DROP TABLE t_old;
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Thanks for your reply :) (just out of curiosity, how is creating a new table with all those rows faster in netezza than updating rows...it seems kinda unintuitive) –  iman453 Oct 30 '12 at 17:39
2  
Netezza doesn't actually update rows in place. Instead, it simply inserts new rows as a new "version" of the row when you do an update, and hides the old rows. When doing an entire table, you essentially are doing 100% new inserts. However, you still have those "hidden" rows that have to be removed with the GROOM TABLE command. When updating the entire table then, creating a new one makes more sense since you don't have to worry about grooming. –  N West Oct 31 '12 at 13:03
    
Ah, makes sense. Thanks! –  iman453 Nov 1 '12 at 1:25
    
I would recommend the CTAS route as well, however if you are doing this operation - you might consider doing the CREATE TABLE .. first, then INSERT INTO then DROP the old table and ALTER TABLE x RENAME last. This way you minimize the duration of which table is unavailable. Drop and Rename is pretty instataneous. –  cairnz Nov 6 '12 at 10:19
    
Agreed @cairnz - I'll update my answer. –  N West Nov 6 '12 at 14:29

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