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Can someone explain to me how Referencing is done in MongoDB, the example here doesn't really helps. What I want to achieve is an option to tell my query to fetch a document, but also data from another document.

This is done using Manual Referencesand I need an example / sample code that demonstrates how it's done. Let's assume that I have users and items table. An Item belongs to a specific user. I want to get the user's detail together with each document that is returned by the query for specific items. So I might get item 1 - 20, but I also want the user's details, instead of making more queries to query the users' data afterwards.

I've read that dbReference is not recommended. Furthermore, if you can, I would be glad to know how to use that type of query that takes advantage of Manual referencing using the official MongoDB C# Driver for .NET. Thanks

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dbReference has it's uses, it is a good way to make a self describing ID if you don't know the target collection, it is just commonly misused. "I would be glad to know how to use that type of query that takes advantage of Manual referencing" It depends on what query your looking to run. Manual References are basically joined and mantained client side in your code rather than on the DB server end. I.e. for your example you would query the user row, and then query for all items, or embed the items into the user row, don't worry about making more queries, it's not a SQL result set. –  Sammaye Oct 30 '12 at 8:56

1 Answer 1

You wrote

I want to get the user's detail together with each document that is returned by the query for specific items.

This isn't like SQL. You don't fetch things together.

All a manual reference means is that you will make two separate queries. One to get the initial document(s) and another to get the related documents via the reference id in the first document.

Doing it in two different queries may seem like more work, but in practice it's very efficient.

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