Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

const auto& would suffice if I want to perform read-only operations. However, I have bumped into

for (auto&& e : v)  // v is non-const

a couple of times recently. This makes me wonder:

Is it possible that in some obscure corner cases there is some performance benefit in using universal references, compared to auto& or const auto&?

(shared_ptr is a suspect for obscure corner cases)


Update Two examples that I found in my favorites:

Any disadvantage of using const reference when iterating over basic types?
Can I easily iterate over the values of a map using a range-based for loop?

Please concentrate on the question: why would I want to use auto&& in range-based for loops?

share|improve this question
3  
Do you really see it "often"? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 29 '12 at 22:44
2  
I'm not sure there's enough context in your question for me to gauge how "crazy" it is where you're seeing it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 29 '12 at 22:49
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Long story short: why would I want to use auto&& in range-based for loops? –  Ali Oct 29 '12 at 22:52
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The only advantage I can see is when the sequence iterator returns a proxy reference and you need to operate on that reference in a non-const way. For example consider:

#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<bool> v(10);
    for (auto& e : v)
        e = true;
}

This doesn't compile because rvalue vector<bool>::reference returned from the iterator won't bind to a non-const lvalue reference. But this will work:

#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<bool> v(10);
    for (auto&& e : v)
        e = true;
}

All that being said, I wouldn't code this way unless you knew you needed to satisfy such a use case. I.e. I wouldn't do this gratuitously because it does cause people to wonder what you're up to. And if I did do it, it wouldn't hurt to include a comment as to why:

#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<bool> v(10);
    // using auto&& so that I can handle the rvalue reference
    //   returned for the vector<bool> case
    for (auto&& e : v)
        e = true;
}

Edit

This last case of mine should really be a template to make sense. If you know the loop is always handling a proxy reference, then auto would work as well as auto&&. But when the loop was sometimes handling non-proxy references and sometimes proxy-references, then I think auto&& would become the solution of choice.

share|improve this answer
    
On the other hand, there's no explicit disadvantage, is there? (Aside from potentially confusing people, which I don't think is much worth mentioning, personally.) –  ildjarn Oct 29 '12 at 22:55
    
That's an interesting point. Presumably there's no way of encouraging range-for to prefer T::const_iterator? I believe begin() and end() are used. Seems like a bit of an oversight, except that you can use rvalue refs. So yeah maybe this is the answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 29 '12 at 23:00
2  
I prefer const auto& when I want the compiler to help me check that I don't accidentally modify the elements in the sequence. –  Howard Hinnant Oct 29 '12 at 23:04
8  
I personally like to use auto&& in generic code where I need to modify the elements of the sequence. If I don't, I'll just stick to auto const&. –  Xeo Oct 29 '12 at 23:08
2  
@Xeo: +1 It is because of enthusiasts like yourself, constantly experimenting and pushing for better ways of doing things, that C++ continues to evolve. Thank you. :-) –  Howard Hinnant Oct 29 '12 at 23:13
show 6 more comments

Using auto&& or universal references with a range-based for-loop has the advantage that you captures what you get. For most kinds of iterators you'll probably get either a T& or a T const& for some type T. The interesting case is where dereferencing an iterator yields a temporary: C++ 2011 got relaxed requirements and iterators aren't necessarily required to yield an lvalue. The use of universal references matches the argument forwarding in std::for_each():

template <typename InIt, typename F>
F std::for_each(InIt it, InIt end, F f) {
    for (; it != end; ++it) {
        f(*it); // <---------------------- here
    }
    return f;
}

The function object f can treat T&, T const&, and T differently. Why should the body of a range-based for-loop be different? Of course, to actually take advantage of having deduced the type using universal references you'd need to pass them on correspondingly:

for (auto&& x: range) {
    f(std::forward<decltype(x)>(x));
}

Of course, using std::forward() means that you accept any returned values to be moved from. Whether objects like this makes much sense in non-template code I don't know (yet?). I can imagine that using universal references can offer more information to the compiler to do the Right Thing. In templated code it stays out of making any decision on what should happen with the objects.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I virtually always use auto&&. Why get bitten by an edge case when you don't have to? It's shorter to type too, and I simply find it more... transparent. When you use auto&& x, then you know that x is exactly *it, every time.

share|improve this answer
    
My problem is that your are giving up const-ness with auto&& if const auto& suffices. The question asks for the corner cases where I can get bitten. What are the corner cases which have not been mentioned by Dietmar or Howard yet? –  Ali Oct 30 '12 at 20:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.