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I have a simple script which displays one button (which is a png image) and when the user clicks it the application quits.

But i want to add multiple buttons which is where im finding my current thinking will lead to a very long if:else situation and I am wondering if that is the only way.

This is how i have my current menu set up in a main.cpp file.

bool handle_mouse_leftClick(int x, int y, SDL_Surface *button) {
 if( ( ( mouseX > x ) && ( mouseX < x + button->w ) ) && ( ( mouseY > y ) && ( mouseY < y + button->h ) ) ) {
        return true;
  } else {
        return false;
 }
}

This is my detection function.

Below is my main function which acts as my game loop, i've removed non relevant code to keep it easier to follow:

//menu button
SDL_Surface *button;
button = IMG_Load("button.png");

while(!quit){
   //handle events
         while( SDL_PollEvent( &event ) ){
               switch(event.type){
                    case SDL_QUIT: quit = true; break;
                    case SDL_MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:

                  if (event.button.button == SDL_BUTTON_LEFT) {
                       if(handle_mouse_leftClick(btnx,btny,button)){
                             quit = true;
                       }
                  }
                    break;
         }
 }

The issue is should my main.cpp have all this checking going on, is going to get very long very quickly when i add more buttons so I'm wondering if I have missed a trick to simplify my efforts?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you get right down to the basic logic/computation, I would say the answer is "no", you haven't missed any tricks. I've never found a way around checking each target one at a time - at least in terms of computation. You could make your code cleaner a lot of ways. You could have a GuiElement class that exposes a "bool IsIn( int x, int y )" method. Then your big case statement would look more like:

bool handle_mouse_leftClick(int x, int y, SDL_Surface *button) 
{
     if (Button1.IsIn( mouseX, mouseY )
     {
         // do this
     }
     else if (Button2.IsIn( mouseX, mouseY ))
     {
         // do that
     } 
     else 
     {
          return false;
     }
 }

You could then further reduce amount code with a list or table:

int handle_mouse_leftClick(int x, int y, SDL_Surface *button) 
{
     for (unsigned int i = 0; i < buttonList.size(); i++
     {
        if (buttonList[i].IsIn( mouseX, mouseY ))
        {
             return i;   // return index of button pressed
        }
        return -1;   // nothing pressed
     }
 }

But it's still ultimately looking at each rectangle one at a time.

Couple caveats:

  1. I don't think there's much real computational overhead in checking the hit boxes of each item - unless you're doing it at some crazy high frame rate.

  2. Sure, you could optimize the checking with some kind of spatial index (like a b-tree or quad-tree organized by the locations of the buttons on the screen), but ... see #1. ;-)

If instead of 10 or 15 buttons/controls you have THOUSANDS then you will likely want to do #2 because #1 will no longer be true.

********* Update ***********

Here's a brief sample of a class that could be used for this. As far as .h vs main.cpp, the typical approach is to put the header in a "Button.h" and the implementation (code) in a "Button.cpp", but you could just put this at the top of main.cpp to get started - it has all the logic right in the class definition.

You'll notice I didn't really write any new code. The "IsIn()" test is your logic verbatim, I just changed the variable names to match the class. And since you already have a single button, I'm assuming you can reuse the code that renders that button the Render() method.

And lastly, if is not something you're familiar with, you don't have to create a list/vector at all. The code the renders the buttons could just call "okButton.Render()", followed by "cancelButton.Render()".

Sample "button" class:

class Button
{
private:
    int m_x, m_y;            // coordinates of upper left corner of control
    int m_width, m_height;   // size of control

public:
    Button(int x, int y, int width, int height, const char* caption)
    {
       m_x = x;
       m_y = y;
       m_width = width;
       m_height = height;
       // also store caption in variable of same type you're using now for button text
    }

    bool IsIn( int mouseX, int mouseY )
    {
        if (((mouseX > m_x) && (mouseX < m_x + m_width)) 
        && ((mouseY > m_y) && (mouseY < m_y + m_height ) ) ) {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }

    void Render()
    {
        // use the same code you use now to render the button in OpenGL/SDL
    }
};

Then to create it/them (using the list approach):

Button okButton( 10, 10, 100, 50, "OK" );
buttonList.push_back( okButton );

Button cancelButton( 150, 10, 100, 50, "Cancel" );
buttonList.push_back( cancelButton );

And in your render loop:

void Update()
{
   for (unsigned int i = 0; i < buttonList.size(); i++
   {
       buttonList[i].Render();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
May i ask what should the class look like for my buttons.. and should i put the class in main.cpp or main.h? –  Dave Oct 30 '12 at 0:17
    
@Dave I added an example of the class that would be used for this. See the "Update" part of my original answer. –  Mark Stevens Oct 30 '12 at 14:03
    
Im bit lost where buttonList was created ? –  Dave Oct 31 '12 at 4:05
    
@Dave Hi. If you wanted to use the list approach, you would just declare it at the top of main.cpp: "std::vector <Button> buttonList;". It would have to global like that so it can be accessed from the create function, the Render function and the Update function. I didn't mean to say this was the "right" way to do this. The "if else" approach you started with is basically the same thing. If that's more comfortable for you that's a perfectly valid approach. –  Mark Stevens Oct 31 '12 at 14:35
    
Is there a any performance difference between then too.. for example would the list use up more memory space compared to my current method and are loops less efficient? I generally see loops as less typing which is only benefit i really see so far. –  Dave Nov 1 '12 at 1:19

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