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How do I create a menu which looks like this...

Tooltip Image

Link to PSD

I don't want to use the PSD images. I would prefer using icons from some package like FontAwesome and have the backgrounds/css generated in CSS.

A version of the menu that is using the PSD to to generate images of the tooltip and then using it can be found here.

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163  
That is a beautiful tooltip from a designer who clearly hates front end developers. –  MrMisterMan Oct 30 '12 at 11:21
18  
Tip: That’s a pie menu, not a tooltip. –  Marc Edwards Apr 27 '13 at 0:16
12  
Or a “radial menu.” Definitely not a “tooltip” though. Tooltips only ever show on hover, and cannot be interacted with. (They describe a tool; they are not a tool.) –  Alan H. Apr 27 '13 at 4:20
1  
There is also similar project on github nikesh.github.io/Pie-Menu by Nikesh Hayaran –  Pavel Hlobil Apr 27 '13 at 16:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 873 down vote accepted
+50

My attempt at doing something of the kind with pure CSS:

demo

(click the star)

Works in Chrome, Firefox (a bit weirdish blur effect on hover), Opera (ends look smaller) & Safari (ends look smaller).

HTML:

<a class='button ctrl' href='#' tabindex='1'>★</a>
<ul class='tip ctrl'>
    <li class='slice'><a href='#'>✦</a></li>
    <li class='slice'><a href='#'>✿</a></li>
    <li class='slice'><a href='#'>✵</a></li>
    <li class='slice'><a href='#'>✪</a></li>
    <li class='slice'><a href='#'>☀</a></li>
</ul>

Relevant CSS (no prefixes):

.ctrl { /* general styles for button & circular menu */
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%; left: 50%;
    font: 1.5em/1.13 Verdana, sans-serif;
    transition: .5s;
}
/* generic styles for links */
a.ctrl, .ctrl a {
    display: block;
    opacity: .56;
    background: #c9c9c9;
    color: #7a8092;
    text-align: center;
    text-decoration: none;
    text-shadow: 0 -1px dimgrey;
}
a.ctrl:hover, .ctrl a:hover, a.ctrl:focus, .ctrl a:focus { opacity: 1; }
a.ctrl:focus, .ctrl a:focus { outline: none; }
.button {
    z-index: 2;
    margin: -.625em;
    width: 1.25em; height: 1.25em;
    border-radius: 50%;
    box-shadow: 0 0 3px 1px white;
}
/* circular menu */
.tip {
    z-index: 1;
    /**outline: dotted 1px white;/**/
    margin: -5em;
    width: 10em; height: 10em;
    transform: scale(.001);
    list-style: none;
    opacity: 0;
}
/* the ends of the menu */
.tip:before, .tip:after {
    position: absolute;
    top: 34.3%;
    width: .5em; height: 14%;
    opacity: .56;
    background: #c9c9c9;
    content: '';
}
.tip:before {
    left: 5.4%;
    border-radius: .25em 0 0 .25em;
    box-shadow: -1px 0 1px dimgrey, 
                inset 1px 0 1px white, inset -1px 0 1px grey, 
            inset 0 1px 1px white, inset 0 -1px 1px white;
    transform: rotate(-75deg);
}
.tip:after {
    right: 5.4%;
    border-radius: 0 .25em .25em 0;
    box-shadow: 1px 0 1px dimgrey, 
                inset -1px 0 1px white, inset 1px 0 1px grey,
            inset 0 1px 1px white, inset 0 -1px 1px white;
    transform: rotate(75deg);
}
.button:focus + .tip {
    transform: scale(1);
    opacity: 1;
}
/* slices of the circular menu */
.slice {
    overflow: hidden;
    position: absolute;
    /**outline: dotted 1px yellow;/**/
    width: 50%; height: 50%;
    transform-origin: 100% 100%;
}
/* 
 * rotate each slice at the right angle = (A/2)° + (k - (n+1)/2)*A°
 * where A is the angle of 1 slice (30° in this case)
 * k is the number of the slice (in {1,2,3,4,5} here)
 * and n is the number of slices (5 in this case)
 * formula works for odd number of slices (n odd)
 * for even number of slices (n even) the rotation angle is (k - n/2)*A°
 * 
 * after rotating, skew on Y by 90°-A°; here A° = the angle for 1 slice = 30° 
 */
.slice:first-child { transform: rotate(-45deg) skewY(60deg); }
.slice:nth-child(2) { transform: rotate(-15deg) skewY(60deg); }
.slice:nth-child(3) { transform: rotate(15deg) skewY(60deg); }
.slice:nth-child(4) { transform: rotate(45deg) skewY(60deg); }
.slice:last-child { transform: rotate(75deg) skewY(60deg); }
/* covers for the inner part of the links so there's no hover trigger between
   star button & menu links; give them a red background to see them */
.slice:after {
    position: absolute;
    top: 32%; left: 32%;
    width: 136%; height: 136%;
    border-radius: 50%;
    /* "unskew" = skew by minus the same angle by which parent was skewed */
    transform: skewY(-60deg);
    content: '';
}
/* menu links */
.slice a {
    width: 200%; height: 200%;
    border-radius: 50%;
    box-shadow: 0 0 3px dimgrey, inset 0 0 4px white;
    /* "unskew" & rotate by -A°/2 */
    transform: skewY(-60deg) rotate(-15deg);
    background: linear-gradient(75deg, 
        transparent 50%, grey 50%, transparent 54%) no-repeat 36.5% 0,
            linear-gradient(-75deg, 
        transparent 50%, grey 50%, transparent 54%) no-repeat 63.5% 0,
        radial-gradient(rgba(127,127,127,0) 49%, 
                    rgba(255,255,255,.7) 51%, #c9c9c9 52%);
    background-size: 15% 15%, 15% 15%, cover;
    line-height: 1.4;
}
/* arrow for central link */
.slice:nth-child(3) a:after {
    position: absolute;
    top: 13%; left: 50%;
    margin: -.25em;
    width: .5em; height: .5em;
    box-shadow: 2px 2px 2px white;
    transform: rotate(45deg);
    background: linear-gradient(-45deg, #c9c9c9 50%, transparent 50%);
    content: '';
}
share|improve this answer
102  
+1 That is superb! –  MrMisterMan Oct 30 '12 at 11:20
65  
and who said CSS isn't programming? :D –  lucassp Oct 30 '12 at 12:23
9  
FWIW, this approach breaks in latest Chrome if you use Tab to cycle through the elements. –  Superpig Apr 27 '13 at 0:39
4  
@Superpig True. This version shouldn't have that problem anymore codepen.io/thebabydino/pen/jfqtv –  Ana Apr 27 '13 at 10:07
4  
@Chii See tympanus.net/codrops/2012/12/17/css-click-events - what I have used here is "the :focus way". It's a pretty old method actually, I first saw it used by Stu Nicholls in his experiments on cssplay.co.uk quite a few years ago. In the CSS above, it's the .button:focus + .tip that does the trick. –  Ana Apr 27 '13 at 12:49

Ana's response is kick ass! That's some serious CSS-fu.

My solution may not be quite what you are hoping for, but it's another possible solution. I'm working on a compass interface right now that has a similar style of arc shaped buttons. I decided to develop it using Raphael and SVG.

I created an arc shape in Illustrator, exported the SVG for it, grabbed the path definition for the arc from the exported SVG file, and used Raphael to build my interface with it.

Here's a JSFiddle of it.

Here's the JavaScript:

var arc = {
    fill: '#333',
    stroke: '#333',
    path: 'M53.286,44.333L69.081,7.904C48.084-1.199,23.615-2.294,0.648,6.78l14.59,36.928C28.008,38.662,41.612,39.27,53.286,44.333z'
};

var paper = Raphael(document.getElementById("notepad"), 500, 500);

var arcDegrees = 45;
var centerX = 210;
var centerY = 210;
var compassRadius = 68;
var currentlyActive = 45;
var directions = [
    {label:'N', degrees:0, rotatedDegrees:270}, 
    {label:'NE', degrees:45, rotatedDegrees:315}, 
    {label:'E', degrees:90, rotatedDegrees:0}, 
    {label:'SE', degrees:135, rotatedDegrees:45}, 
    {label:'S', degrees:180, rotatedDegrees:90}, 
    {label:'SW', degrees:225, rotatedDegrees:135}, 
    {label:'W', degrees:270, rotatedDegrees:180}, 
    {label:'NW', degrees:315, rotatedDegrees:225}
];

function arcClicked()
{
    var label = $(this).data('direction-label');
    $("#activeArc").attr('id', null);
    $(this).attr('id', 'activeArc');
}

for (i = 0; i < 360; i += arcDegrees) {
    var direction = _.find(directions, function(d) { return d.rotatedDegrees == i; });
    var radians = i * (Math.PI / 180);
    var x = centerX + Math.cos(radians) * compassRadius;
    var y = centerY + Math.sin(radians) * compassRadius;

    var newArc = paper.path(arc.path);
    // newArc.translate(x, y);
    // newArc.rotate(i + 89);
    newArc.transform('T' + x + ',' + y + 'r' + (i + 89));

    if (direction.degrees == currentlyActive) {
        $(newArc.node).attr('id', 'activeArc');
    }

    $(newArc.node)
        .attr('class', 'arc')
        .data('direction-label', direction.label)
        .on('click', arcClicked);
}

Here's the related CSS:

#notepad {
    background: #f7f7f7;
    width: 500px;
    height: 500px;
}

.arc {
    fill: #999;
    stroke: #888;
    cursor: pointer;
}

.arc:hover {
    fill: #777;
    stroke: #666;
}

#activeArc {
    fill: #F18B21 !important;
    stroke: #b86a19 !important;
}
share|improve this answer

Another very good way would be to use JavaScript for the positioning.

DEMO + TUTORIAL on making an animated radial menu

A pro to this method is that you can use any number of elements and it will keep positioning them radially, without having to change any of your CSS.

The JavaScript in question is:

var items = document.querySelectorAll('.circle a');

for(var i = 0, l = items.length; i < l; i++) {
  items[i].style.left = (50 - 35*Math.cos(-0.5 * Math.PI - 2*(1/l)*i*Math.PI)).toFixed(4) + "%";

  items[i].style.top = (50 + 35*Math.sin(-0.5 * Math.PI - 2*(1/l)*i*Math.PI)).toFixed(4) + "%";
}

document.querySelector('.menu-button').onclick = function(e) {
   e.preventDefault(); document.querySelector('.circle').classList.toggle('open');
}
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I love the elegant result of this solution, it's a shame it has no upvotes! –  merosss Aug 17 at 8:08

protected by Charles Apr 27 '13 at 0:26

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